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December 2017

D

Joy comes in the mourning

  At whatever age—but perhaps especially in old age—mourning can comprise a substantial part of our daily thoughts. The writer of Psalm 30 offers a helpful observation: “Joy comes in the morning.” Psalm 30:5) At this time in our lives, this can be especially comforting. As we may have experienced into these later years, though, not every morning brings joy. Our days may begin with somethingMORE...

Full of (past) years

  One of my end-of-years practices is to find quiet time during the holidays for the purpose of reviewing the year(s) past, and for looking ahead to the coming year. (My future-imagining is dependent on joy- and gratitude-filled recollections of the past.) It’s one of the life rituals that I cherish highly. The lengthening string of my years stretches past easy recollection. As I siftMORE...

Locker room talk

  Okay, guys, listen up. There’s something we older men should talk about. Something we should be doing Yes, I’m talking about exercising regularly at our age. Let me remind you how this works. If we don’t exercise, our bodies and brains head south. (Ever heard of “use it or lose it”?) With too much weight, too little flexibility, balance or aerobics, we may be cutting years off our livesMORE...

When the fullness of time had come…

  One of the most beautiful Scriptural images that emerges at this time of year is embodied in Galatians 4:4 – the idea that God sent Christ into the world when “the time was full.” The text cradles Christmas themes quite well, perhaps mixing together some of the sweet and tender thoughts that come at this time of year. God waiting for the right time–historical and cultural conditionsMORE...

Another look at waiting

Previously I noted that waiting can get old—tempting us to give up on being patient. There’s another side to this idea of waiting, which brings me to two other propositions: • If waiting can get old, old-age waiting can also be good. • Waiting in your later years can also be rich and full. Looking back at your life, you can see examples of instances when waiting worked out well, some large, someMORE...

When waiting gets old

Waiting is a normal part of life. In checkout lines and traffic lanes; at restaurants or service centers. Waiting for your garden to grow, your children to mature, your romances to blossom. Pregnancy is a time of waiting. Wounds heal, wine ages and soups simmer. Approaching your later years, though, the waiting takes on a different cast. It cuts deeper into your identity, lasts longer andMORE...

Old wallet spirituality

Right now you may be sitting on (or carrying) a semi-sacred storehouse of spiritual richness. I’m talking about your wallet, billfold, clutch, purse—or whatever appurtenance holds artifacts that mark your identity. Today, I’d like you to consider how your wallet could be filled with spiritual markers. The items in your wallet may have spiritual meaning—even if you’re living in a situation whereMORE...

Old fools near and far

  “The only thing worse than a fool is an old fool.” So goes a maxim that was easy to believe when I was younger—it didn’t apply to me. Not so these days—when the folly of older men seems to be front-and-center in the news. Yes, much of the stupidity of sexual predation can be blamed on genuine jerks. But some of these older fellows have also exhibited garden-variety foolhardiness: They’veMORE...

Why “scam artists” bother me

It’s a fact: Senior citizens are a preferred target for online and on-phone predators. *The AARP knows this, you know this and God knows this: So-called scam artists think that we’re especially prone to fall prey to their lying, cheating and stealing. This makes me angry—and I want to tell you why! (Self-disclosure: In the months I’ve been posting these blogs, a lot more spamming/scamming schemesMORE...

How (NOT) to patronize older adults

  In my experience, patronizing anyone isn’t a good idea. In fact, it’s harmful—to others, to yourself and to your relationships. It might seem otherwise: the etymology of “patronize” leads back to the kindly father/patron who has in mind only the best interest of others. Personal experience tells us otherwise: Patronizing behaviors are rooted in arrogance masked as kindness; their netMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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