Full of Years

If you value people who are older—and also your own aging—these entries will help you rejoice in the fullness of this stage of life: its gritty realities, secret joys, hidden spirituality and cherished moments—reasons to be grateful that old age is always a gift from God!

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In my face

  It’s hard to ignore what’s right in front of me in these times. Good news: Self-sacrificing essential workers, wise governors, scientists and inventors. Not-so-good news: A world-wide plague, stubborn injustice, invisible danger and dangerous people, economic troubles. News, opinions, testimonies, stories, hard questions—all of them front-and-center at almost every waking moment. What’sMORE...

A really holy week

  Today’s entry started as a presumptive blog about how our observance of Holy Week this year might just match early Christian worship in Rome’s catacombs. When I read the historical background about this underground cemetery, though, I realized that my supposed good idea had no basis in fact. The early Christians used the catacombs less as settings for meetings or worship, and more often asMORE...

BONUS FEATURE: Elderly Exegetics – April 2020

  Today’s entry continues a series of short musings about lectionary texts that may soon appear in your line-of-sight. These thoughts may be helpful in interpreting the appointed lessons with sensitivity to the realities faced by those who are older. APRIL 2020 Background This month brings worshippers into full contact with a pandemic whose character calls out even more strongly for theMORE...

Too small to think about….

In case you missed these barely-noticed elements of daily life in COVID-19 times, let me share below some things I’ve noticed lately. They may not warrant the full treatment of a blog posting, but still might deserve just an iota of your attention! *Iota Are there any large iotas? Could they add flavor to a kale salad? Is iota another name for dust bunnies? Will most iotas survive this pandemicMORE...

Lord know, we have the time….

My wife and I are coming to the end of our second week of COVID-19 stay-at-home living. Chris put this experience into perspective a few days ago, when we were deciding what to do together. “Lord knows, we have the time,” she observed. “We can artfully sculpt our time into a beautiful day.” To be honest with you, I’ve had trouble accepting the blessing of abundant time. On the one hand, the giftMORE...

What else is there to think about?

  Over the past week or so, I’ve been waiting for the coronavirus news to settle down. Here’s why: Whether out of prudence, trying to fill empty leadership niches or injecting trust and truth back into the emotional economy, leaders of all kinds have been filling my mailbox with assurances and information. I appreciate their thoughtfulness. This is probably a once-in-a-lifetime crisis, andMORE...

An abundance of caution

There’s a lot of caution going around now. Everywhere, it seems. As a preface for almost any announcement, caution-abundance carries the same amount of linguistic freight as the well-worn phrase, “We take (fill in the blanks) very seriously.” Assured by plentiful prudence, readers/viewers know that whatever they see/hear will be well-infused with the presumably admirable trait of caution. Lots ofMORE...

Viral Lent

I don’t know if it’s just me, but this year’s Lenten season seems especially essential, relatable and inviting of my spirit. Lent themes and emotions seem strongly connected to current events almost everywhere I look. Thoughts arising out of the *COVID-19 outbreak are a good example. Perhaps Lent has gone viral? Lent calls me to confess my sinfulness, to seek forgiveness and to hope dearly forMORE...

Keeping in touch

Because of widespread concerns about COVID-19, physical touching now brings special considerations to my life. I can’t touch my face—germs might sneak into my nose. Touching others during the Greeting of Peace is not medically advised. (See earlier note about shifty viruses.) I am cautioned not to come in contact with surfaces that are not yet cleansed of viral microorganisms. “SocialMORE...

Moreover well-aged

Sometimes a word gets stuck in my mind and won’t leave until I bathe it in other words. The process of my word-mulling sometimes takes awhile, which can result in a properly aged expression—let’s say, moreover?—ready for use in blogs for older adults! At its simplest, moreover means something like “And in addition…” That works in a Bible passage like, “Moreover, it is required of stewards thatMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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