Full of Years

If you value people who are older—and also your own aging—these entries will help you rejoice in the fullness of this stage of life: its gritty realities, secret joys, hidden spirituality and cherished moments—reasons to be grateful that old age is always a gift from God!

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A voice in the wilderness

One of Advent’s most haunting texts is the one about “A voice crying in the wilderness, ‘Prepare ye the way of the Lord!’” This quiet passage (Isaiah 40:3) has always tugged at my soul because I’ve imagined some person out there in the middle of nowhere—wildernesses are tough places to live—yelling out loud about something important. In the outback places of life—any wilderness is out thereMORE...

Climate conversation 1: Announcement

Today’s entry begins a periodic series of observations about the certain fact that the changes in the world’s climate will affect all of us, old and young alike. Because this blog tilts in the direction of spiritually centered older adults, the series will lean into the basic question: As God’s people, what can we think or do about these matters? Today an introduction…. It seems fitting to beginMORE...

I know a guy….

  One of the most rewarding aspects of life can be the connections we have with other people. “I know a guy…” is one way of describing these relationships. You and I may know a lot of men and women whose character and capabilities we admire. The longer we live, the more of these folks we know. At first glance they seem ordinary, but when we know them a little better, we realize how theyMORE...

The end is near II

The entries for yesterday and today look at the idea of “endings”, and how we might react to that idea as it plays out in our lives. Today: How endings effect my spirit. As I move through my seventh decade of life I’m more and more intrigued how ending-ideas worm their way into my thoughts. The current seasons of the calendar and liturgical years nudge me to make sense of these matters. Not justMORE...

The end is near I

The entries for today and tomorrow look at the concept of “endings”, and how we might react to that idea as it plays out in our lives. Today: Some concept exploration…. The title above, evocative of scores of cartoons, is also familiar emotional territory for older adults. Endings of any kind may seem to gather like lifespan sentries, silently watching as we move toward conclusive events andMORE...

Your lifework

  If you’ve followed this blog series for awhile, you’ve seen my frequent use of the term, “lifework.” It’s an important concept to me, with roots and tendrils that extend into my sense of self. Dictionary definitions suggest connections to the scope of one’s life, and the work that is accomplished during its duration. Knowing your lifework requires a broad perspective about your essentialMORE...

An older man gives thanks

Although our culture is already rushing towards Christmas, I’m sticking with the delightful prospect of celebrating Thanksgiving first—reflecting on the thoughts and actions of being thankful at this stage in life. Consider what follows here as the thankful thoughts of an older man. Perhaps someone not unlike you…? To set these ideas in context, you should know that I’m very happy to be an oldMORE...

The colorful people we are

Colorful people like you and me can serve a purpose. That’s one of the thoughts that UCLA psychology professor Alan Castel shares in his new book, Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging. Castel notes that his interest in gerontology started when he was a child, spending considerable time with older relatives—many of them genuinely unique characters who displayed traits thatMORE...

Second-shift worker ministry?

A recent edition of Christianity Today features a cover article worth reading—and perhaps considering as part of your personal ministry. The author is Jeff Haanen, CEO of the Denver Institute for Faith & Work. His premise is forceful: Honoring work as a place of ministry can get narrowed down to only one kind of worker, leaving out people whose occupations are difficult at best andMORE...

Between ability and fragility

Eventually all of us will cross the line between physical/mental capability and fragility. During this part of life’s journey, the demarcation point might be broad and relatively invisible—a gradual deterioration of strength or the gradual redevelopment of cancer. This boundary could also be thin but highly visible—a stroke or broken hip. In either case, we will reckon with the transition, makingMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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