Full of Years

If you value people who are older—and also your own aging—these entries will help you rejoice in the fullness of this stage of life: its gritty realities, secret joys, hidden spirituality and cherished moments—reasons to be grateful that old age is always a gift from God!

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Latest Entries

Climate conversation 5: The hard part

Today’s entry is part of an occasional set of observations about changes in the world’s climate that will affect all of us, old and young alike. The series bends toward a key question: As God’s people, how should we respond? Today’s entry: Taking action, even though it may be difficult. As I’ve noted in previous Climate Conversations, the scientific evidence regarding global warming makes it moreMORE...

Tutor affirmations

  For the past few years, I’ve been a tutor in an English as Second Language (ESL) program. Our congregation houses one of the ESL sites of a local non-profit; we work mainly with refugees and other immigrants. Many of the students have come through extremely difficult circumstances to arrive at this point in their lives. All of them see English proficiency as a major key to their well-beingMORE...

This little light of mine

A few days ago, it occurred to me that this familiar Sunday School song—almost a brain-worm melody—might be a really good way to encourage each other again about an especially important part of being old: We have lights and they still shine! This Gospel and social protest song from the 1920s can ring true right now. If you and I take “This little light of mine” as a way of summarizing how ourMORE...

The zeitgeist of a hospital visit

One of the special privileges of older adult years is visiting folks in the hospital. Like funerals or memorial services, these visits can be exquisite times of spiritual depth—occurring at just the right “god-moment”—that might be hard to capture in words. Let me tell you about a recent hospital visit that might match similar experiences in your life. Perhaps these thoughts might help youMORE...

Yelling at the end

At our church, I’m one of the assisting ministers. At the end of the service, I turn off my microphone and my polite voice, and belt out the dismissal sentence: GO IN PEACE TO LOVE AND SERVE THE LORD. The congregation responds AMEN and we head towards the doors, back out into our lives. A lively organ or instrumental postlude leads the way. In the ancient liturgical tradition, this way of endingMORE...

Wondering wandering

This post-Christmas entry connects to the quiet Native American Christmas carol, I Wonder as I Wander. Its haunting melody and plaintive words can be deeply moving for any of us who have felt that “wandering” is an apt description of our lives! Among the benefits of being a retired older guy are the recurring moments when my wanderings through life’s necessary routines allow me the time and spaceMORE...

Climate conversation 4: Anyone listening?

Today’s entry is part of a periodic series of observations about changes in the world’s climate that will affect all of us, old and young alike. The series bends toward a key question: As God’s people, what can we think or do about these matters? Today’s entry: How to pay attention to these facts? The stark conclusions of the *Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA), Volume II seem so astoundingMORE...

See something, say something

Let me tell you about a recent experience that may illustrate a different take on the maxim, “If you see something, say something.” I was at my eye doctor’s office, waiting for my monthly injection. I noticed another elderly patient—we’ll call her Janice—who was politely asking the receptionist about her next appointment. As time went on, it became apparent that Janice seemed to have someMORE...

Being kind

This is the final entry in a series of posts that come from the gift of a magnetic bumper sticker given to me at a North Carolina retreat for older adults. The message was simple and compelling: BE SILLY. BE HONEST. BE KIND. The surprising author of this surprising quote: Ralph Waldo Emerson. Yep, that one…. Does the world around you feel kind? Maybe the Pollyanna part of me is working here, butMORE...

Being honest

This entry is the second part of a series inspired by a Ralph Waldo Emerson quote: BE SILLY. BE HONEST. BE KIND. If you follow either Chris or me as we drive, you’ll see this helpful message on a magnetic bumper sticker. Honesty may seem to be in short supply these days. Not just at the highest rungs of the political ladder, but perhaps also invisibly spread through various sectors of leadershipMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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