Category

Arcania

An odd category at first glance, this is the place where you can find odd facts, rocks you can turn over, minutia that’s important, wandering musings and rabbit trails to tempt you into different realms of thought. “Miscellany” might describe the category, and it might not….

A

After Memorial Day

This past Memorial Day an old memory of my father came back into focus. It had to do with his World War II military service. I think this collection of thoughts came about as I imagined the feelings of families whose loved ones have died while in uniform. Thinking about their losses recalled my father’s circumstances as a draftee right at the end of that war. Ed Sitze was already married and theMORE...

Keep talking

Keep talking “Like father, like son.” If that’s true, I have inherited my father’s enjoyment of shared conversations with friends and colleagues. (My mother’s descriptive noun for him was Schnatterpeter—a Low German phrase meaning something like “one who likes to talk with others about relatively ordinary matters, a chatterbox.”) To the consternation of those around me, when I schnatter, I don’tMORE...

Who is that masked man (or woman)?

My wife and I are mask-wearers. When we cover our faces in public, people may wonder, “Who’s behind those masks?” *The Lone Ranger, one of my all-time radio favorites, got that same reaction; people wanted to know who he was under that disguise. This pandemic may set up the same question about us. At first glance, our face coverings identify us in two ways: On the one hand—as senior citizens—weMORE...

Too small to think about….

In case you missed these barely-noticed elements of daily life in COVID-19 times, let me share below some things I’ve noticed lately. They may not warrant the full treatment of a blog posting, but still might deserve just an iota of your attention! *Iota Are there any large iotas? Could they add flavor to a kale salad? Is iota another name for dust bunnies? Will most iotas survive this pandemicMORE...

Lord know, we have the time….

My wife and I are coming to the end of our second week of COVID-19 stay-at-home living. Chris put this experience into perspective a few days ago, when we were deciding what to do together. “Lord knows, we have the time,” she observed. “We can artfully sculpt our time into a beautiful day.” To be honest with you, I’ve had trouble accepting the blessing of abundant time. On the one hand, the giftMORE...

An abundance of caution

There’s a lot of caution going around now. Everywhere, it seems. As a preface for almost any announcement, caution-abundance carries the same amount of linguistic freight as the well-worn phrase, “We take (fill in the blanks) very seriously.” Assured by plentiful prudence, readers/viewers know that whatever they see/hear will be well-infused with the presumably admirable trait of caution. Lots ofMORE...

Moreover well-aged

Sometimes a word gets stuck in my mind and won’t leave until I bathe it in other words. The process of my word-mulling sometimes takes awhile, which can result in a properly aged expression—let’s say, moreover?—ready for use in blogs for older adults! At its simplest, moreover means something like “And in addition…” That works in a Bible passage like, “Moreover, it is required of stewards thatMORE...

Revisiting the Tower of Babel

I’m not a total fan of artificial intelligence. I may be wrong—my intellect does not tower over the rest of humanity—but my older adult warning lights continue to flash: At its foundation, AI is still only an artifice of actual intelligence, perhaps lacking wisdom in its fullest sense. While we benefit from some applications of AI, self-idolatry may be embedded in other sectors of AI’s premisesMORE...

The other side of the coin

(Sometimes I need to look at my older adult life from a lighter side. Today seemed like one of those times, mostly because the news cycle can seem so heavy. So serious and anxious, too. Perhaps you could find your own lightness?) I’m reading an English best-seller written by Angela Kelly, Personal Advisor, Curator and Senior Dresser to Her Majesty the Queen (The Queen’s Jewellery, Insignias andMORE...

Sine nomine

According to supposed generational characteristics, I function inside the crease between The Silent and Baby Boomer generations. To say that another way, I don’t fit either description. That’s why I prefer to think of my generational self with the same moniker as the tune for the hymn “For All the Saints”—sine nomine (literally “without a name” in Latin). I now consider myself an older adult. NoMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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