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Current Events

Here’s where the roving eye of Bob Sitze lands on interesting or important events, trends, discoveries, opinions or research that are part of contemporary life. Sometimes missed in spiritually oriented utterances, the stuff of life consists of all the places where God’s hand stirs, supports or motivates. These blogs may also include links for further information or action.

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A social media metaphor?

COVID cave-dwelling has offered me opportunities to observe facets of daily life that might serve as useful metaphors or analogies. Today this example: Social media may be like *digital ant poison. See if my ant trap comparisons make sense…. Ant traps/baits contain deadly substances that don’t kill immediately. Scout ants smell and taste the traps’ wonderful flavor, and then head back to theMORE...

What about change?

Lately I’m having trouble with change. As one well-practiced in transformation, I wonder whether change per se is being over-sold just a bit. It wasn’t always this way. Decades ago, I learned from effective leaders and wise older mentors how change can (and cannot) happen. I’ve experienced change throughout my life. pursuing about a dozen careers, relocating to eight different parts of theMORE...

Celebrating Michael and All Angels

On September 29, we will once again celebrate this sometimes-hidden festival in the church year. At first glance, it’s a good day to think well of angels. This sometimes-overlooked occasion holds a lot more meaning, though, especially helpful in these times. Occurring close to the date of the autumnal equinox, this commemoration gives us the opportunity to gratefully acknowledge angelic creaturesMORE...

Communion kits

During this continuing pandemic, worship in many places has included the use of Communion Kits. These prefilled communion cups hold in individually wrapped spaces a swallow of grape juice topped with a wafer. My reaction to their use has included grudging acceptance of their necessity in COVID times, and nagging displeasure about these substitutes for the sacramental elements of bread and wine. IMORE...

No joke

I don’t tell lawyer jokes. And I try to indicate my displeasure—not laughing—when someone tells one. Today’s thoughts spin out my reasoning. My emotions, too. A few days ago, a dear member of our congregation—we’ll call him Scott—died suddenly. He was a lawyer, highly regarded and beloved by clients and colleagues. He was born and raised around here, so his mourners have long histories that theyMORE...

Rejoicing in okay

When asked to characterize my well-being on surveys, I used to check the EXCELLENT box automatically. These days I’ve moved down one frame to the GOOD descriptor. And I’m happy to do so, rejoicing about being just okay. GOOD is also a strong adjective to be glad about. Let me explain…. Perhaps like you, over the years I’ve faced my share of ill health and physical deterioration. Without gettingMORE...

We pray

These two short words introduce each Sunday’s Prayer of the Day, summoning the collected thoughts of God’s people. They’re an ordinary part of each worship service, capturing the gist of the day’s lessons and inviting us beyond what’s ordinary. In these times, “we pray” seems more necessary than ever. As both invitation and statement of fact, these two words describe one of the core elements ofMORE...

Dealing with anger hopefully

It’s difficult to treat addictions of any kind, and anger addiction adds its own layers of complexity. The complications are easy to see: Anger is both an individual and group phenomenon. A subculture of anger-merchants has worked for decades to insert anger into the way this society functions. Fuel for continuing anger is easily accessible, so those addicted to anger may not seek help. PoliticsMORE...

Anger addiction

Let me be blunt. “Anger addiction” is not a metaphor or a loosely applied descriptor. People who are easily and continually angry exhibit the same behaviors as those addicted to any substances or habits that are ultimately harmful to them and those around them. Those who engage in anger as a preferred or constant practice are addicts. The evidence is clear: Whole segments of our population are inMORE...

Anger doesn’t work that well

As a student of neuroscience, I understand that anger is one part of an automatic reaction to stress or danger. Continual anger doesn’t work all that well, though.  In the long run, constant or habituated anger just isn’t all that practical. Eventually or ultimately: Anger doesn’t last. Unless continually stoked by circumstances or other people, anger dissipates when the real or imagined dangerMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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