Category

Death/Dying

Not grim and not somber, this category wades into matters of death and dying with some observations about the big picture and details that sometimes don’t see the light of day!  Full of years, readers and viewers will find this category a good place to begin conversations and redeem what might otherwise seem to be an easily avoided part of life.

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Thanks for nothing

  No, really, God…. I mean it. I want to thank you for absolutely nothing. That may sound odd—something is usually better than nothing. At the start and end of my life, “nothing” will characterize me. “Having nothing” is the way I arrived into this world—naked and crying about starting my new life outside the protection of my mother’s body. And as you know, dear Lord, it’s the way I’llMORE...

Initiating “The Conversation”

Somewhere along the aging timeline, “The Conversation” should take place: A heartfelt chat, discussion or exploration of the question of how Mom and/or Dad will be able to live well when they can’t take care of themselves in their home. Either parent might resist the conversation—it raises difficult realities that will certainly come to pass. But in many families the question may actually soundMORE...

Something could break

  Many items in our homes—appliances, automobiles, toys, structures, systems, furniture— may be poised at the edge of a sudden breakdown. Rust grows and corrodes; tiny internal parts fracture; elements burn out or mysterious materials stop working. In many cases, we have no warning about an impending breakdown, and so are surprised when a fuel pump stops working, a pipe bursts, a roof leaksMORE...

How to grow old?

    Perhaps I missed it—I read mostly non-fiction—but I could really use a story with a title something like This is How You Age Well. A tale of inspiring, even epic proportions. Sound familiar? If so, you may also appreciate the other side of that narrative: YOU may be a good teacher for others who want to understand how to move into their older years with grace and satisfaction. EvenMORE...

Giving up (or not)?

I’ve seen it coming in too many of the older people I know and love: Throwing in the towel—giving up or just not keeping up. Not caring about most things. Letting life and limb go to pot. Perhaps you’ve experienced small indications that this kind of thinking is germinating inside your spirit…? It’s easy to say that spiritually minded folks shouldn’t give up on life. But as we get older, someMORE...

Am I rotting away?

This blog is part of an ongoing series that answers an intriguing question: What might it mean for older adults to claim that they are still “fearfully and wonderfully made?” Occasionally I spend time looking at parts of my body that aren’t working like they used to. For example, I’m noticing that, despite exercises to improve this condition, my neck wattle is approaching the size of a turkey’sMORE...

How do you want to be remembered?

A graveyard is a good place to gain perspective on life—in all its tenses and tensions. The past tugging at the shirt sleeves of the present; the future hiding behind gravestones; today’s dirt and dust hiding yesterday’s ashes.  In a cemetery, all of life can be rolled into one picture: A collection of markers that signal the lives of remarkable people. Cemeteries also call to mind the questionMORE...

Plan your own memorial service, Part Three

What would happen if your memorial service was a truly unique experience for those who attended? Consider these observations: Most memorial services are buried in words—the verbal outpourings of grieving others who try to find just the right way to express an avalanche of emotions that show themselves in an avalanche of verbiage or platitudes. What would happen if your or my memorial service wasMORE...

Plan your own memorial service, Part Two

Elsewhere here I’ve encouraged you to consider the task of planning your own memorial service, and communicating the plans to those who will survive you, as well as those who might develop that service. In these paragraphs I want to offer you some hints on how to go about that task. Start now The longer you wait, the harder the work will be, especially if your physical or mental conditions areMORE...

Plan your own memorial service, Part One

Planning your own memorial service is one of those advance death directives—like having a will or naming a power-of-attorney for your health and financial affairs—that makes good sense. Your memorial service—a valuable worship experience for all who survive you—may turn out to be the last and highest witness of your spiritual core. Those in attendance will come ready for more than a usual time ofMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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