Category

Death/Dying

Not grim and not somber, this category wades into matters of death and dying with some observations about the big picture and details that sometimes don’t see the light of day!  Full of years, readers and viewers will find this category a good place to begin conversations and redeem what might otherwise seem to be an easily avoided part of life.

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In an instant

Advent seeds have been sprouting in my spirit during Lent. The seeds? Things begin, but they also end. Both can happen in an instant. The seasonal growth of these kernels takes a little more time to describe. On one hand, Advent heralds both the end of all things—Judgment Day—and their beginning—A Baby Savior foretells deliverance. On the other hand, Lent leads me through the horrors of punishingMORE...

*Obituary tips

If icebergs reveal only their tips—they aren’t shy, just heavy—it seems possible that obituaries might also share that characteristic. Perhaps the same heft.  In both cases, there’s more to be seen and told. I have known about this similarity—icebergs and obituaries—for years. Every day I read the Obituary section of the newspaper. I wrote obits for both my parents. I understand how theMORE...

The household manual, Part 2

As I’ve been writing a manual about our household—in printed and digital formats—I’ve also realized the benefits of this effort. Perhaps you could find similar blessings writing your own descriptions and instructions. While engaged in details-sleuthing and writing, I’ve realized that I can at the same time organize household files, simplify processes, discard unused items and remember what thisMORE...

The household manual, Part 1

Here’s an idea that might be helpful…. Like me, you may have experienced what happens when an executor or adult child has to pick up the pieces of a legacy or estate when a loved one has died. Those who remain must sort through perhaps-confusing elements of normal household functioning. In too many cases, that information is scattered, hidden or non-existent. Your loss creates chaos and begs forMORE...

A COVID Advent

Advent will soon be peeking out from our calendars. This time around, Advent will be observed in the middle of a worldwide epidemic. It’s possible, though, that these four weeks could be helpful for our spirits. COVID-19 is called a coronavirus because its cells’ club-shaped projections resemble the tines of a crown. During this past Lent, this crown-mimicry recalled the thorned-garland crushedMORE...

What else is there to think about?

  Over the past week or so, I’ve been waiting for the coronavirus news to settle down. Here’s why: Whether out of prudence, trying to fill empty leadership niches or injecting trust and truth back into the emotional economy, leaders of all kinds have been filling my mailbox with assurances and information. I appreciate their thoughtfulness. This is probably a once-in-a-lifetime crisis, andMORE...

An abundance of caution

There’s a lot of caution going around now. Everywhere, it seems. As a preface for almost any announcement, caution-abundance carries the same amount of linguistic freight as the well-worn phrase, “We take (fill in the blanks) very seriously.” Assured by plentiful prudence, readers/viewers know that whatever they see/hear will be well-infused with the presumably admirable trait of caution. Lots ofMORE...

Viral Lent

I don’t know if it’s just me, but this year’s Lenten season seems especially essential, relatable and inviting of my spirit. Lent themes and emotions seem strongly connected to current events almost everywhere I look. Thoughts arising out of the *COVID-19 outbreak are a good example. Perhaps Lent has gone viral? Lent calls me to confess my sinfulness, to seek forgiveness and to hope dearly forMORE...

Winking out

Today I just want to share a sad part of growing older: Dealing with the loss of those near and dear. Specifically, those beloved elders from my past who seem to disappear suddenly, like twinkling stars that wink out without much of a trace. This has occurred to me earlier in life—teachers, friends and mentors who have died or descended into illnesses that prohibit communication with them. As IMORE...

Remembering who you are

When I’m down on myself—not fully appreciating who I am at this time in life—it’s usually because I’ve forgotten who I have been. Trying to claw my way out of the generalized anxiety that characterizes our society, I’m sometimes not able to rekindle my best self—a fully-functioning creature of God’s own hand. Some of that occurs because I am not fully connected to what God has accomplishedMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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