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Lifestyle

This category gathers together blogs that deal with daily life matters. Sometimes generic, other times challenging and always positive, this category embodies the nitty-gritty of fullness-of-life.

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Old fools near and far

  “The only thing worse than a fool is an old fool.” So goes a maxim that was easy to believe when I was younger—it didn’t apply to me. Not so these days—when the folly of older men seems to be front-and-center in the news. Yes, much of the stupidity of sexual predation can be blamed on genuine jerks. But some of these older fellows have also exhibited garden-variety foolhardiness: They’veMORE...

Why “scam artists” bother me

It’s a fact: Senior citizens are a preferred target for online and on-phone predators. *The AARP knows this, you know this and God knows this: So-called scam artists think that we’re especially prone to fall prey to their lying, cheating and stealing. This makes me angry—and I want to tell you why! (Self-disclosure: In the months I’ve been posting these blogs, a lot more spamming/scamming schemesMORE...

On taking a walk

When we became empty-nesters, Chris and I began to walk almost every day. Our walks were usually forays into nature—to and from a local park, in a nearby forested area or even around the perimeter of our neighborhood. We spent about an hour each time, enjoying the prospect of healthy physical exercise and quiet conversation. Even since we’ve added regular exercise classes to our daily routinesMORE...

The dependables in my life

  Knowing that I am a certifiably dependent older adult, I have come to realize the good news that I am surrounded by people who are dependable. Some are easy to spot: Family and friends who are there when I need them, watching me carefully and ready to spring into action. They’re bound to me because of love and shared experiences. These are the folks I have no trouble asking for assistance;MORE...

Little (old) kindnesses

  When I was younger, I noticed how older relatives would apologize for the size or significance of their gifts. Given that prompting, I agreed: Their presents were usually small, barely appropriate to my childhood dreams. Nothing big nor exciting came from their generosity. In my hedonistic or materialistic mindset, a gift was good only when it was big, surprising, unique, fashionable andMORE...

The day is coming

  From what I hear, probably the most difficult adjustment at this stage in life comes when our car keys or driver’s license are taken away. (I’m pretty sure that very few of us voluntarily relinquish this all-important element of our independent living!) The giving up of a car may arise from a near or actual crisis, and it likely precipitates others that seem far worse. I write this entryMORE...

Thanks for nothing

  No, really, God…. I mean it. I want to thank you for absolutely nothing. That may sound odd—something is usually better than nothing. At the start and end of my life, “nothing” will characterize me. “Having nothing” is the way I arrived into this world—naked and crying about starting my new life outside the protection of my mother’s body. And as you know, dear Lord, it’s the way I’llMORE...

Scruffy hat, scruffy guy

  If you met me on the street, you might mistake me for someone whose mother didn’t teach him how to present himself in a tidy and respectable matter. At this stage in life, I accept that possibility, because I am perfectly content with old clothes, a battered baseball cap and uncombed eyebrows. (Some of you old guys out there may know what I mean, right?) On one hand, this phenomenon is notMORE...

How to grow old?

    Perhaps I missed it—I read mostly non-fiction—but I could really use a story with a title something like This is How You Age Well. A tale of inspiring, even epic proportions. Sound familiar? If so, you may also appreciate the other side of that narrative: YOU may be a good teacher for others who want to understand how to move into their older years with grace and satisfaction. EvenMORE...

A memories jar

Most of us want to be remembered after we’ve died. Many of us might not think about the value of our leaving behind some artifacts—memories embedded in memorable items—that will help others continue their fond memories of us. (Remember that tender reminiscences can be powerful motivations for behaviors that emulate what a dearly departed friend or relative embodied.) Suzy Strunk of suburbanMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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