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Lifestyle

This category gathers together blogs that deal with daily life matters. Sometimes generic, other times challenging and always positive, this category embodies the nitty-gritty of fullness-of-life.

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A playing time

  Easter has come, but it’s not gone! The meaning of this incredible event includes a life-renewing invitation, perhaps directed at those of us who are fully vaccinated: “Can you come out to play?” Given all that we’ve been through this past year, “play” may seem like too strong a word for how we might live now. Fun and frivolity may feel like empty-headed avoidance of reality. Over thisMORE...

Preventing moths, rust and thieves

When I stop panicking about digital thefts of my well-being, I remember again that there is one reliable way to combat the moths, rust and thieves that may plague my digitized lifestyle: Among my “heavenly treasures” are our family’s personal relationships! A few days ago, I had reason to worry about possible identity theft involving bank accounts. My frantic mind could not recall the gatewayMORE...

Moths and rust

In Jesus’ day, treasures—especially expensive garments and money—were vulnerable to the disintegrating forces of moths, rust and burglars. This matter—the vulnerability of material/financial well-being—seems particularly pertinent in these times. Today’s thieves-in-the-night are as stealthy and insistent as those Jesus referred to in his Sermon on the Mount. Scammers and grifters especiallyMORE...

Estate sale miscellany

This entry is part of a blog series, Time Capsules, that considers what our family’s stored artifacts tell about our family history. Today, I invite you to look at the keepsakes scattered throughout our home. Estate sales sometimes include a bin labeled “Miscellaneous”. In this container is all the stuff that couldn’t be assigned monetary worth. After more easily identified articles are sold andMORE...

Lent unlike any other?

This time around, Lent seems more focused, more tangible—perhaps more real?—for me. Almost like I’ve come back to Lent’s original nature or purpose. I’m tempted to think that this is especially true for older adults, but that’s probably not accurate: This time around, Lent is for all of us. Lent-like thoughts and feelings seem to have been tagging along with me for the past year. Deep sorrowMORE...

Like an old squirrel?

Lately I’ve been looking out my window at the various places where I have planted, tended and harvested vegetables and flowers in past years. I’ve realized that I may have the same problem as some 1 older squirrels: I don’t remember where I put the nuts. (In my case, the seeds harvested from last year’s plants.) This may seem like a simple problem—just see what emerges when the ground warms, andMORE...

Wretched individualism

1 Individualism took a hit in Texas this past week. Alongside the punishing circumstances of power outages and bursting water pipes was the realization that disregard for the common good eventually hurts everyone. Even those who thought of themselves as rugged or self-sufficient were brought to their knees—a distressing posture when your power is out and your knees are deep in freezing waterMORE...

An abundance of remembering

I’m an avid reader of obituaries—a habit that keeps me grounded and grateful. Through the past months, I’ve noticed that, “due to COVID-19 complications,” most memorial services for loved ones are being delayed until unknown future times. Sooner or later, a multitude of these events could fill our calendars.  A good thing! I can envision these soon-to-come memorials as distinctly different fromMORE...

Creeping out of my cave

I’m starting to anticipate that these long months of hermitage will be coming to an end. There will be a day—I’m thinking that it’ll be sunny and warm—when I can put my collection of face masks into the back of a drawer, and come out into the world without worrying about the dangers of hidden viruses being spread just by my breathing. That will be a good day, whenever and however it comes—perhapsMORE...

Holy family work (Part 2)

There are some parallels between the post-Christmas work of Jesus’ parents and the work that lies before us in these times. Salvation has come upon us—perhaps seen in the results of this past election—yearnings for righteousness to return. We’ve prayed for rescue from evil and oppression, and now that seems possible. The message of Christmas has assured and calmed us once again. Like Mary andMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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