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Lifestyle

This category gathers together blogs that deal with daily life matters. Sometimes generic, other times challenging and always positive, this category embodies the nitty-gritty of fullness-of-life.

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Between ability and fragility

Eventually all of us will cross the line between physical/mental capability and fragility. During this part of life’s journey, the demarcation point might be broad and relatively invisible—a gradual deterioration of strength or the gradual redevelopment of cancer. This boundary could also be thin but highly visible—a stroke or broken hip. In either case, we will reckon with the transition, makingMORE...

Finding humor

Brian Crane, creator of the syndicated cartoon strip Pickles, has a knack for finding the whimsical side of older adult married life. His two main characters, Earl and Opal Pickles, live in retirement with their eyes trained on what’s humorous about being together for over 50 years. Crane’s characters are able to find what’s quirky and playful about this stage in life. The insights of theirMORE...

Campaigning with Spirit: Being old and spiritual

This entry is part of a series of blogs that connect political volunteering with spiritual themes. These observations come from my current volunteering for a congressional candidate. Today’s thought: Political volunteering is well-suited to older adults. Many of the other campaign volunteers I work with are older adults. That shouldn’t surprise me—those of us who are older are really passionateMORE...

Campaigning with Spirit: (NOT) sitting around

This entry is part of a series of blogs that connect political volunteering with spiritual themes. These observations come from my current volunteering for a congressional candidate. Today’s thought: Not much good happens when I just sit around. I’ll be honest: I sat out the last election. Sure, I voted with due deliberation about candidates and their positions. But I didn’t have any skin in theMORE...

(Involuntary) Simplicity

In his classic Voluntary Simplicity: Toward a Way of Life that is Outwardly Simple, Inwardly Rich (Quill Books, 2010), social scientist and visionary Duane Elgin speaks eloquently about the possibilities of choosing to live simply. Hidden within the book and implicit in his further writings, though, is the idea that lifestyle simplicity may also be involuntary for many of us. At some time in theMORE...

Spiritual themes in my spam folder

For reasons unknown to me, my e-mail service is now collecting huge amounts of spurious messages—also known as “spam”—and placing them into a euphemistically labeled “Bulk Mail Folder”. (Other servers are more direct, calling this stuff what it is: Junk Mail.) It occurred to me that there may be some spiritual themes that ride along with the spam. Some examples may help you understand what I’mMORE...

How much longer?

Like a happy puppy, another birthday just galumphed up next to me, doing its best to get my attention. Again this year, I am glad to consider the blessings of my past, my satisfaction with the present and my hopes for the future. As the total years of my life add more and more numerals, it becomes a frequent feature of my waking moments to ask, “How much longer?” The question can serve as aMORE...

Broken stuff

As I grow older, I’m increasingly aware of the number of broken things that surround me. In some cases, these items have been part of my life for awhile. No matter how much they bother me, these small wrecks in my lifestyle have resisted my repairing and discarding skills. So, for example, I live with a hair brush detached from its handle, a tool with a missing part, a tottering fence proppedMORE...

No worries!

Have you experienced this phenomenon lately? It seems like “No worries!” might be ascending as a useful replacement for the familiar “No problem!” It comes at “Excuse me” moments, when someone is apologizing for a minor mistake. For example, let’s say that I don’t readily yield the right-of-way to a cyclist, realize my mistake, quickly apologize and then hear from the cyclist, “No worries!” TheMORE...

The greater good, Part 3

  In this three-part series, The greater good, we’ve considered how our decision-making can reflect the Christian values of empathy and community. In this final entry, we imagine how these principles might be especially suited to being old. No matter how difficult it might seem to seek the greater good, we keep at it. We’re not interested in lives that are selfish; we want to follow Jesus’MORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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