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Lifestyle

This category gathers together blogs that deal with daily life matters. Sometimes generic, other times challenging and always positive, this category embodies the nitty-gritty of fullness-of-life.

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When oldsters congregate

  Normally I don’t suggest separating out cohorts—age, gender, interest—in a congregation. My default philosophy runs in the opposite direction: We learn, grow, prosper and bless each other when all of us are joined together in our work as God’s people. Recently, though, I had the experience of being with a large, day-long gathering of older adults, all assembled in one place for mutualMORE...

The deteriorating shower house

  Our mountain home’s shower house is falling apart. Granted, it’s over 75 years old and has been in gradual decline for several decades. But older buildings shouldn’t just deteriorate like that—they’re supposed to be a symbol of stability and permanence in a world that always seems to be disassembling itself. To be direct: I don’t like to see this legacy building—on our family’s heritageMORE...

Too soon we grow old…

  Now that I have your attention—perhaps you were thinking that this entry would offer a plaintive sadness about the slow departure of youthfulness?—let me come clean: What I really hope we can think about together is the second section of the Pennsylvania Dutch aphorism: “Too late we grow smart!” While the first part of the saying is always true—who can avoid the inevitability of aging?—theMORE...

Whatever happened to…?

  A few years back, my high school graduating class celebrated our fiftieth anniversary with a reunion. It was a fully satisfying event, and I came away full of gratitude for these folks—who they were back then and who they are now. During the get-together, we wondered about the classmates that weren’t with us, and what has transpired in their lives. “Whatever happened to (fill in theMORE...

Celebrating older birthdays

  Some older adults I know profess a lack of interest in celebrating their birthdays in any significant way. This attitude may come from their feeling that there’s not much to celebrate once you come to a certain age plateau. So it could seem pointless to observe a birth anniversary—“It’s just not that important how old I am.” Other possibilities: Not wanting others to make a fuss about youMORE...

A hypocrite’s hope

  When I was a young lad, I learned that hypocrisy is a bad attribute. Jesus did not like hypocrites—mostly leaders who were not practicing true religion. In high school, I was taught an added fact: Most of us are hypocrites in one way or the other, me included. Now hypocrisy came home, but with a double-standard irony: Others’ duplicity was easier to see and condemn than my own. SomeMORE...

Frozen fashion?

  This entry presents another perspective on a perhaps-puzzling later-in-life matter: Those older folks whose apparel and personal appearance may seem frozen in time. First, the phenomenon—one you may observe in others OR a way of life you’re starting to adopt: Patterns of clothing, shoes, grooming, jewelry or accessories that might suggest that they or you may have stopped caring aboutMORE...

Suddenly and surely frail

  If we live long enough, we eventually age into frailty. The imperfections and infirmities of old age gather at the perimeters of our daily lives—biding their time, respectful of our earlier elderliness, but also certain that they will eventually come into the center of our existence and self-images. That they will have their way with us. I have watched as this inevitable part of life hasMORE...

Filling the hole

When my former career came to an end, retirement’s opportunities seemed well-defined. I was ready for whatever ”refirement” was supposedly all about. A small problem still stares at me, though: A vaguely empty space deep inside. My former identity—filled with role expectations, prescribed routines, well-known relationships and largely predictable cause-and-effect sequences—was no longer availableMORE...

No joke

  One way some comedians can get you to laugh is by pretending to be angry. (Think Don Rickles or Lewis Black.) And it doesn’t take long for you to see through their faux-fury. You realize soon enough that part of their shtick is poking fun at anger itself. The joke is on perpetually angry people. It’s no joke, though, how you may being scammed by angry others. Not by those comedians. AndMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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