Category

Lifework

Here is where you can find the blogs that gather together the matters of purpose and meaning — essential features of a full life at any age. “Lifework” denotes an intense and long-lived sense of usefulness–something that’s prevalent among older people.

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They deserve to know….

  It’s likely that your life has been packed with the blessings given to you by mentors, coaches, teachers, sponsors, counselors, pastors, youth group leaders, employers, supervisors and other people who helped you become who you are today. They deserve to know how their investment in your life turned out! Few of these individuals expect to know the eventual results of their efforts on yourMORE...

Been there….

  At this point in our lives, it can feel good to state—with some authority—that we’ve “been there.” This is a shorthand way of saying that the depth and breadth of our life histories might be valuable for others. That the accumulation of our skills and experiences might also name our enduring practical wisdom. Recalling this truth about our lives may equip us to be story-tellers of highMORE...

Decluttering decluttering

  Somewhere along the line, this blog shifted out from under my grasp. I fully intended to spotlight the best-selling book, The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning, a newer entry in the growing field of decluttering. The more I thought about the subject, the more it skittered away from easy definitions or explanations. This made me wonder if I needed to straighten up decluttering in my ownMORE...

A modest proposal

  All “modest proposals” usually start with modest questions. So take this title as a sign that I’m not sure how to write about a current situation that may be vexing you and me. The matter: The continuing anxiety I feel when confronted or assaulted by political news of the day or moment. To be specific, the ways in which otherwise thoughtful and righteous folks have yielded their moralMORE...

A foolish Easter?

  This trip around the calendar year, Easter shares its date with April Fools Day! That fact got me to thinking about this confluence of holidays, wondering about what that might mean. With these words comes my invitation for your thoughts on the subject. I really enjoy April Fools Day. Always have, always will—even into my later years. Show me a good prank—carefully chosen semi-sillinessMORE...

Quixotic elder

I’ve always wondered how it felt to be Don Quixote. He was an elderly fellow—50-ish, considered old in his time—when his self-appointed adventures began. Deemed insane, foolish or both, this self-designated knight took on a series of causes that, in his mind, were necessary for the well-being of others. His self-image can serve as a warning for any of us who imagine the importance of our lives inMORE...

Ministry of loneliness

  In recent weeks, news reports have noted the establishment of a well-regarded function of Great Britain’s governmental bureaucracy: The Ministry of Loneliness. The announcement was notable for several reasons: • The need for this work has been known for years—loneliness is a health matter that correlates with diminished physical and mental health that has spread across Britain’s relationalMORE...

The long arm of history

  The older I get, the more the long arm of history seems to touch me. Born in the previous century, I have the sense that I’m supposed to do more than just acknowledge the guiding hands of yesteryear. The longer I live, the more I feel the responsibility to be a steward of the past, helping ensure that current generations don’t live as though there is nothing valuable to be learned fromMORE...

Full of what?

Late in his life, my father would often comment, “Getting old isn’t for sissies.” This was his way of reminding himself and the rest of us that fullness of years isn’t a walk in the park. It was my father’s voice—and witness—that came to mind when I started these blogs. It would be easy to think of fullness-of-years as code language for an older-adult version of the prosperity gospel—as thoughMORE...

Writing your family history (for caregivers)

  Two of our family’s most-treasured possessions are family history books. Our grandchildren and great-grandchildren will always know the legacies of my mother and mother-in-law, both strong, determined women who—with the assistance of other family members—created these cherished volumes. If you are considering this possibility, let me encourage you with these few observations: • Begin theMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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