Category

Lifework

Here is where you can find the blogs that gather together the matters of purpose and meaning — essential features of a full life at any age. “Lifework” denotes an intense and long-lived sense of usefulness–something that’s prevalent among older people.

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Magnificat!

In case you want to get a head start on Advent, these few thoughts about the Song of Mary (Luke 1:46-56).  In our turbulent times, the words of this prayer remain true in our turbulent times. At any time of the year…. I have reprinted here the Magnificat’s words for your reading—and rejoicing—pleasure: Mary said: With all my heart I praise the Lord, and I am glad because of God my Savior. GodMORE...

Emulsifying elders

At a racial unity Bible study a few nights ago, I learned a new way to think about the power of older Christians to bring people together. Pastor and author *Tony Evans has offered the metaphor of **emulsion to describe how God’s people can bring together disparate or disagreeing groups of people. As I understand the chemistry, emulsifiers enable the identities of two different substances to beMORE...

Thanking “the forgotten people”

I see a lot of “Heroes work here” signs around town. The banners and signboards spotlight ongoing appreciation and gratitude for workers whose daily vocations are laudable. Sometimes, though, the intended recipients seem limited to predictable categories: Law-enforcement and medical workers. Although they certainly are heroes, these aren’t the only people whose work is essential to society’sMORE...

Thou art Peter…

I’ve always been fascinated by rocks–touchstones, stones for skipping in ponds, brightly colored pebbles in streams, and boulders whose heft is humbling. I like rocks so much that I once taught a short summer school college course whose textbook was *The Incredible Thrilling Adventures of the Rock! What recalled all my rock-loving was the Gospel on a recent Sunday morning. (See MatthewMORE...

Back to work

With a little over two months until the November election, Chris and I are back to work as campaign volunteers. I write this entry to invite you to join us in this essential part of our lived-out faith. During the last election runup, we participated in several tasks, including sending postcards, delivering yard signs, phoning voters, marching in parades and canvassing door-to-door. During GetMORE...

The bin of music

This entry is part of a series, Time Capsules, in which I think about one or more of the places in our home where my history—and my future?—are evident in stored artifacts. Today, I share my thoughts about one of the ways in which I was once quite skilled. Deeply buried in one of our basement closets is a large plastic bin that holds organ, piano, vocal and recorder pieces from the many years inMORE...

Parenting that never stops

My parents always worried about me. (After Chris and I were married, those thoughts included her.) My father’s key question was usually, “Do you have enough money?” and my mother’s queries usually centered on being healthy. They held onto those parenting instincts throughout my adulthood. The present situation—the economy, COVID-19, the political maelstrom—seems to be heightening my own olderMORE...

The matter of Black lives

“Black lives matter”—now both a cultural meme and a growing enterprise–reminds me how the wellbeing of Black persons is too-frequently taken away or tamped down. Systemic racism is named as the cause—rightly so. But another incriminating possibility also comes to mind: That I don’t know the ordinary and extraordinary characteristics of which those lives consist—their matter. I may beMORE...

Scavenging

  Watching shopkeepers and volunteers clean up the damage from the recent rioting and looting, I have seen something reminiscent of what tornado survivors do: Scavenging. Returning to normal starts with sifting through the wreckage to find what might be valuable or critical. If I want to salvage anything or anyone, scavenging is a necessary skill and attitude. Another down-and-dirty elementMORE...

Salvaging revisited

  A few days ago, I offered some thoughts about salvaging. More needs to be said…. As I suggested previously, salvaging is a kind of rescuing that also extends into other areas of life: Reshaping attitudes that are bent out of shape; fixing broken relationships; propping up wobbly social institutions; salving the deep emotional wounds of those who are dispirited or downtrodden—a peopleMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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