Category

Mind/Body

In this category you can find all the blogs that focus on mind/body matters, separately or intertwined. As people age, this aspect of life can be the most worrisome or worse. In these blogs, “fullness” suggests otherwise.

M

Too soon we grow old…

  Now that I have your attention—perhaps you were thinking that this entry would offer a plaintive sadness about the slow departure of youthfulness?—let me come clean: What I really hope we can think about together is the second section of the Pennsylvania Dutch aphorism: “Too late we grow smart!” While the first part of the saying is always true—who can avoid the inevitability of aging?—theMORE...

Spirituality and chronic illness

  For several years I’ve been working with an occupational therapist on the question: How could spirituality re-emerge as a vital part of this profession? This entry examines one part of that search: How might chronic illness diminish a person’s spiritual self? (Also implied: How might spirituality help diminish the debilitating circumstances of a chronic illness or disability?) SomeMORE...

Suddenly and surely frail

  If we live long enough, we eventually age into frailty. The imperfections and infirmities of old age gather at the perimeters of our daily lives—biding their time, respectful of our earlier elderliness, but also certain that they will eventually come into the center of our existence and self-images. That they will have their way with us. I have watched as this inevitable part of life hasMORE...

No joke

  One way some comedians can get you to laugh is by pretending to be angry. (Think Don Rickles or Lewis Black.) And it doesn’t take long for you to see through their faux-fury. You realize soon enough that part of their shtick is poking fun at anger itself. The joke is on perpetually angry people. It’s no joke, though, how you may being scammed by angry others. Not by those comedians. AndMORE...

Finding profundity

At this time in life, I continue to seek profundity. In the ideas, thoughts and words that come my way, as well as the thoughts and words that I express. Perhaps you’ve thought the same: Wishing for spirituality, wisdom or life purpose that doesn’t float in the shallows of intellect, knowledge or honesty—like intellectual/spiritual flotsam and jetsam. Not always being satisfied with surfaceMORE...

Inside tai chi

  It seems clear that tai chi is good for mind, body and spirit—especially for older folks who may not want to pump iron, run marathons or engage in other physical activity that might just be a little bit beyond their (physical) reach. What may be missing in these summary exhortations/invitations, though, are some further specifics about what tai chi does for someone who practices itMORE...

Hypochondriac or hyped self-care?

We senior citizens are besieged with too many well-meaning health warnings and directives! From TV commercials and pop-up ads for new pharmacological wonders to the omnipresent reminders from our friends at AARP, there’s more than enough information about how we can avoid large problems and take care of what ails us. This deluge of information can help and harm me. On the one hand, I soak upMORE...

Old and (still) loving

When my spouse and I were courting, and had come to the point of being pretty sure we wanted to spend our lives together, we would sometimes imagine what it would be like to be in love at some advanced age in our future. Rocking chairs on the porch was always our go-to image, spring or summer the imagined season and comforting coziness the ambience with which we would enjoy those loving timesMORE...

Memento mori

“Remember that you must die”. This is the function of a recently developed *Web app that will send you five randomly-spaced text messages each day that focus on this timeless truth. (The developers of this app credit a famous Bhutanese folk saying that professes “to be a truly happy person, one must contemplate death five times daily.”) Not-so-strangely, the creators of this app are serious aboutMORE...

Sleep in our later years (Part 2)

Previously we looked at the harm that can come to older bodies and minds when sleep is diminished or disrupted. This entry offers some hopeful ideas that can help you alter perhaps-unhelpful sleep habits. Perhaps the most important idea: Start now to establish healthy sleep patterns. Even in your later years, you can change how you think of sleep, and how you can develop sleep-practices thatMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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