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Personal Power

Too many older adults feel as though they have lost power as they age. The exact opposite may be true, and this category assembles the blogs that explain and celebrate this certainty: Our personal power may remain strong and useful in our later years.

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“Nobody knows the trouble I’ve seen”

First it was Ken who entered hospice. Then Kent. And just yesterday, the news came that Bill has been placed under the care of a local hospice program. In each case, this later stage in personal and medical care has followed years of the quiet agonies that come when dealing with disease. What has struck me in each of these cases is how family members have worked out of sight of most of ourMORE...

A smiling ministry?

Looking for a personal ministry that’s simple and effective? How about one that involves smiling? Other people’s smiles! First, a quick review about the nature and effect of smiles. Click on this link– recall what I wrote a few years back, and then come back here to continue reading. Yes, it’s always a pleasant experience to smile—and be smiled at—but there may be more to this simple actMORE...

The upside of today’s downsides

(Today’s entry finds its inspiration in the *October 20, 2019 column by Pulitzer Prize-winning Chicago Times columnist Mary Schmich, “What if this time of chaos is the beginning of something better?” .) It’s not news that we live in more-than-interesting times—they’re downright difficult, actually. All around us—sometimes inside of us—fear, confusion, anger and depression seem stronger than weMORE...

I don’t know

After years of life-experiences and advanced education, I know a lot. One of the most valuable things I know is that there are a lot of things I don’t know. At this time in my life, I’m finding more occasions where I lack knowledge. This truism became apparent during a recent trip Chris and I took to Costa Rica. Over and over again, we found out that much of what we were experiencing was totallyMORE...

Fiddling while Rome burns

For a few weeks now, this phrase has been like a non-musical brain worm, stuck in the part of me that wonders about the state of the world, and my place in it. You know the legend—Nero playing music while the city burned around him, and later blaming Christians for the fire. Obviously, Nero could be analogous to any fatally flawed leader. That would be an easy bit of mental gymnastics, as inMORE...

Parsing aches and pains

One of the challenges I face in growing older is discerning when to pay attention to hurts, twinges and discomforts that may or may not be signs of something serious. One reaction: To disregard all but the most persistent or painful problems. Another response—characterized as hypochondria—is to worry that each symptom is a warning sign of an underlying disease or malfunction. I live squarely inMORE...

Chronic old age?

  “Old age is a chronic condition.” So goes a supposedly clever bumper-sticker. The meaning seems clear: Being or getting old is like having a disease that won’t go away. As you might guess, I will spend the following paragraphs fuming at the concept behind this condensed negativity. First a look at “chronic”. Derived from chronos (time), it’s usually associated with something difficult thatMORE...

What day is it?

  One of the easiest questions on the *Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) is “What day of the week is it?” One problem with your possible response: After a few years of retirement, you might think of every non-working day as just another Saturday! Neuroscientists report that, on awakening, our brains first check for answers to two questions: “What time (day/date/season) is it?” and “WhereMORE...

Sensory travels

  This blog is not about inhaling the glorious odor of Helix Phalaenopsis orchids in Vanuatu. Instead, I’m going to invite you to see how your senses can help you travel to the limits of your sight, hearing, smelling, touch, taste, balance/movement and body awareness. Each sense can also take you deeply into what is close at hand. Each connects to your brain’s memory centers, joining past toMORE...

Deferring dementia 2

This and the previous entry propose the likelihood that most congregations offer their members—perhaps especially older members—benefits that might help deter or delay the effects of Alzheimer’s dementia. Today several other possible factors that may match your congregation’s capabilities. Socialization No older adult benefits from being unknown. Research across a variety of studies has found aMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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