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Personal Power

Too many older adults feel as though they have lost power as they age. The exact opposite may be true, and this category assembles the blogs that explain and celebrate this certainty: Our personal power may remain strong and useful in our later years.

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Keep talking

Keep talking “Like father, like son.” If that’s true, I have inherited my father’s enjoyment of shared conversations with friends and colleagues. (My mother’s descriptive noun for him was Schnatterpeter—a Low German phrase meaning something like “one who likes to talk with others about relatively ordinary matters, a chatterbox.”) To the consternation of those around me, when I schnatter, I don’tMORE...

Playing around

If you know me at all, you know that I’m playful. Not always a good thing—I’ll grant you that—but at least my playfulness keeps me in touch with my inner child! Given the spirit of these times—perhaps now etched into my own—some of my normally good-humored self doesn’t seem available. Maybe it’s even leached out of me? I understand how this might have happened. Playing around—an essential part ofMORE...

Who is that masked man (or woman)?

My wife and I are mask-wearers. When we cover our faces in public, people may wonder, “Who’s behind those masks?” *The Lone Ranger, one of my all-time radio favorites, got that same reaction; people wanted to know who he was under that disguise. This pandemic may set up the same question about us. At first glance, our face coverings identify us in two ways: On the one hand—as senior citizens—weMORE...

One key to wisdom

One task I face almost every day: To hold onto or regain my emotional moorings. To be wise. These are stressful times, and stress can work against wisdom, so the work of wisdom-ing is sometimes tough for me. A few years back—when I was gathering source material for my Stewardshift book—I came across a considerable amount of research about wisdom. *One author named delayed gratification as aMORE...

Words abound

For a few months now—especially since we all agreed to remain sequestered in our homes—something is happening to words. I’m not sure, but there seem to be more good words out there. In here, too. A good thing—renewed evidence that there’s still power in words. I’m noticing that there are a lot more people taking the time—and expending considerable effort—to cobble together, sculpt, throw on theMORE...

An abundance of caution

There’s a lot of caution going around now. Everywhere, it seems. As a preface for almost any announcement, caution-abundance carries the same amount of linguistic freight as the well-worn phrase, “We take (fill in the blanks) very seriously.” Assured by plentiful prudence, readers/viewers know that whatever they see/hear will be well-infused with the presumably admirable trait of caution. Lots ofMORE...

Just counting: An idea

Sometimes the smallest acts of civic engagement help justice to count. I think that Census2020 might be an example. In another week or so, you and millions of others will receive in the mail a letter detailing how to submit your household’s 2020 census information online. Should you not choose to complete the form in that fashion, the Census Bureau will mail you a paper version. If, for someMORE...

Salt of the earth people

A few Sundays back the Gospel was centered on “salt of the earth” and “light for the world” images. Familiar concepts, not all that earth-shattering or snazzy—We are salt and light. That’s a good thing. Go out there and be one of those two. Or both. End of sermon…. Not at our church that day. As part of her homily, our pastor invited us to think about “salt of the earth” people. The folks whoMORE...

Remembering who you are

When I’m down on myself—not fully appreciating who I am at this time in life—it’s usually because I’ve forgotten who I have been. Trying to claw my way out of the generalized anxiety that characterizes our society, I’m sometimes not able to rekindle my best self—a fully-functioning creature of God’s own hand. Some of that occurs because I am not fully connected to what God has accomplishedMORE...

The other side of the coin

(Sometimes I need to look at my older adult life from a lighter side. Today seemed like one of those times, mostly because the news cycle can seem so heavy. So serious and anxious, too. Perhaps you could find your own lightness?) I’m reading an English best-seller written by Angela Kelly, Personal Advisor, Curator and Senior Dresser to Her Majesty the Queen (The Queen’s Jewellery, Insignias andMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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