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Personal Power

Too many older adults feel as though they have lost power as they age. The exact opposite may be true, and this category assembles the blogs that explain and celebrate this certainty: Our personal power may remain strong and useful in our later years.

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Fearing fear

If FDR was right about “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself,” it seems that we might have every reason to be fearful right now. This possibility became evident to me a few days ago after a seniors exercise session. One of the participants wanted to tell a few of us how the rioting and looting of recent months had convinced her that total chaos would come after the November election. IMORE...

While writing voter reminder cards

My wife and I will soon mail out hand-written postcards to remind voters about the importance of the coming election. As we do this work, we find ourselves reflecting about more than getting the addressee’s names written correctly and writing the same message over and over legibly. This might seem like mindless work, but it isn’t. Chris and I have noticed a definitely spiritual cast to what we’reMORE...

Emulsifying elders

At a racial unity Bible study a few nights ago, I learned a new way to think about the power of older Christians to bring people together. Pastor and author *Tony Evans has offered the metaphor of **emulsion to describe how God’s people can bring together disparate or disagreeing groups of people. As I understand the chemistry, emulsifiers enable the identities of two different substances to beMORE...

It’s a puzzle

As a member of the daily newspaper puzzle cult, I enjoy the challenges of solving a variety of word-related brainteasers. And because of this daily routine, I also see puzzle comparisons everywhere I go and in everything I do. The obvious ones stand out like gold nuggets in a streambed: I am improving my older adult cognition. I surmount mental challenges that are involved in choosing the rightMORE...

Thanking “the forgotten people”

I see a lot of “Heroes work here” signs around town. The banners and signboards spotlight ongoing appreciation and gratitude for workers whose daily vocations are laudable. Sometimes, though, the intended recipients seem limited to predictable categories: Law-enforcement and medical workers. Although they certainly are heroes, these aren’t the only people whose work is essential to society’sMORE...

Thou art Peter…

I’ve always been fascinated by rocks–touchstones, stones for skipping in ponds, brightly colored pebbles in streams, and boulders whose heft is humbling. I like rocks so much that I once taught a short summer school college course whose textbook was *The Incredible Thrilling Adventures of the Rock! What recalled all my rock-loving was the Gospel on a recent Sunday morning. (See MatthewMORE...

Render unto Caesar?

With growing evidence that the Caesars of our era are corrupting the world—Jesus’ sentiment about *Caesar-rendering doesn’t sit comfortably in my soul. A quick look at the matter follows…. I understand the setting for Jesus’ answer to his detractors’ tricky question. (See Matthew 22:15-22. )And I know that Paul’s announcement—“The powers that be are ordained of God” (Romans 13:1ff)—is part ofMORE...

Back to work

With a little over two months until the November election, Chris and I are back to work as campaign volunteers. I write this entry to invite you to join us in this essential part of our lived-out faith. During the last election runup, we participated in several tasks, including sending postcards, delivering yard signs, phoning voters, marching in parades and canvassing door-to-door. During GetMORE...

Encouraging the encouragers

Today, I offer a thought that could easily get lost in the dust storm of anger and anxiety that comes at us every day: Our society’s encouragers could use some encouragement themselves, and you and I could be just the ones to do that! I regularly write letters to a variety of political and societal leaders, usually critical in a nice way. It occurs to me, though, that positive letters—we’ll callMORE...

A thought experiment

Let me invite you into a thought experiment that might be useful. Some background first. “What’s next after COVID-19?” is coming our way.  Although none of us can accurately predict the future, envisioning specific potentials can work alongside nimble, skillful reactivity. We trust God’s providence, however it might unfold. The experiment starts with questions like these: What do you think willMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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