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Personal Power

Too many older adults feel as though they have lost power as they age. The exact opposite may be true, and this category assembles the blogs that explain and celebrate this certainty: Our personal power may remain strong and useful in our later years.

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Why “scam artists” bother me

It’s a fact: Senior citizens are a preferred target for online and on-phone predators. *The AARP knows this, you know this and God knows this: So-called scam artists think that we’re especially prone to fall prey to their lying, cheating and stealing. This makes me angry—and I want to tell you why! (Self-disclosure: In the months I’ve been posting these blogs, a lot more spamming/scamming schemesMORE...

How (NOT) to patronize older adults

  In my experience, patronizing anyone isn’t a good idea. In fact, it’s harmful—to others, to yourself and to your relationships. It might seem otherwise: the etymology of “patronize” leads back to the kindly father/patron who has in mind only the best interest of others. Personal experience tells us otherwise: Patronizing behaviors are rooted in arrogance masked as kindness; their netMORE...

Old times and old-timers

  In an earlier entry ( ), I’ve written how difficult it is to find the proper appellation for someone who’s old. From my younger days until now, though, I’ve also believed that “old-timer” could be a title that was mildly complimentary to the older people I encountered. So I have used the term as a preferred way to address elderly folks who showed me that wisdom or whimsy still sparkedMORE...

Rethinking prophetic work

  I’ve been reading Isaiah again. One of the things I’ve noticed is that Isaiah—or several “Isaiahs”—seems to be bothered by more than apostasy, heresy or idolatry. Something else is grabbing and shaking his (their) soul. It seems to me that Isaiah is also railing at the breakdown of the social fabric—in Judah and Israel, but extending to the various empires adjoining the limited geographyMORE...

The multitude formers

  *The Family of Man–the classic coffee-table book whose photographs and captions inspire us to cherish the universal qualities of humanity–ends with photographs of couples from around the world. The caption that characterizes all of these forebears: “We two form a multitude.” The message is clear: Whether in marriages, friendships or kinships of any kind, bonds of love produceMORE...

Ashamed about bodily functions

  One of the things I know about getting older is that eventually some of my bodily functions will stop working very well. This will likely be embarrassing. I can imagine the day when someone might have to feed, wipe or clean me up, when they will talk to me about basic body functions that just aren’t what they should be. I’ve thought about matters like drooling, spilling food or makingMORE...

The dependables in my life

  Knowing that I am a certifiably dependent older adult, I have come to realize the good news that I am surrounded by people who are dependable. Some are easy to spot: Family and friends who are there when I need them, watching me carefully and ready to spring into action. They’re bound to me because of love and shared experiences. These are the folks I have no trouble asking for assistance;MORE...

Little (old) kindnesses

  When I was younger, I noticed how older relatives would apologize for the size or significance of their gifts. Given that prompting, I agreed: Their presents were usually small, barely appropriate to my childhood dreams. Nothing big nor exciting came from their generosity. In my hedonistic or materialistic mindset, a gift was good only when it was big, surprising, unique, fashionable andMORE...

How will they know?

The older you get, the less most folks know about you. Two reasons: There are fewer people around you who have known you for awhile. And you probably don’t go around bragging about your history—work, family, adventures, accomplishments, roles, extraordinary knowledge or skills. For those reasons, nothing special about you sticks out in most folks’ minds—and so you are stuck inside only oneMORE...

The day is coming

  From what I hear, probably the most difficult adjustment at this stage in life comes when our car keys or driver’s license are taken away. (I’m pretty sure that very few of us voluntarily relinquish this all-important element of our independent living!) The giving up of a car may arise from a near or actual crisis, and it likely precipitates others that seem far worse. I write this entryMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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