Category

Relationships

This category brings together any blogs that comment on the relationships that exist among older adults, as well as their relationships with people in younger age groups.  Some of these relationships are full, rich and rewarding, while others need effort and prayer. In all cases, relationships keep older adults healthy, spiritually mature and purposed.

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Salvage

  For a couple of weeks, salvage has been following me around like a kitten looking for a home. Sometimes unobtrusive and at other times almost in my face, this word has gradually wormed its way into my conscious thoughts. Some of them follow here. Salvage is derived from salvare, the Latinate root for salvation. The 17th century noun form first designated the payment offered for saving aMORE...

Keep talking

Keep talking “Like father, like son.” If that’s true, I have inherited my father’s enjoyment of shared conversations with friends and colleagues. (My mother’s descriptive noun for him was Schnatterpeter—a Low German phrase meaning something like “one who likes to talk with others about relatively ordinary matters, a chatterbox.”) To the consternation of those around me, when I schnatter, I don’tMORE...

Who is that masked man (or woman)?

My wife and I are mask-wearers. When we cover our faces in public, people may wonder, “Who’s behind those masks?” *The Lone Ranger, one of my all-time radio favorites, got that same reaction; people wanted to know who he was under that disguise. This pandemic may set up the same question about us. At first glance, our face coverings identify us in two ways: On the one hand—as senior citizens—weMORE...

Keeping in touch

Because of widespread concerns about COVID-19, physical touching now brings special considerations to my life. I can’t touch my face—germs might sneak into my nose. Touching others during the Greeting of Peace is not medically advised. (See earlier note about shifty viruses.) I am cautioned not to come in contact with surfaces that are not yet cleansed of viral microorganisms. “SocialMORE...

Just counting: A story

A few days ago, our English as a Second Language (ESL) program hosted an informative presentation regarding Census2020. The tutors and the students learned about the process and the content of this nation-wide plan for counting everyone in the United States. The program, presented in English and translated into Arabic and Amharic, provided all of us what we need in anticipation of receiving theMORE...

Winking out

Today I just want to share a sad part of growing older: Dealing with the loss of those near and dear. Specifically, those beloved elders from my past who seem to disappear suddenly, like twinkling stars that wink out without much of a trace. This has occurred to me earlier in life—teachers, friends and mentors who have died or descended into illnesses that prohibit communication with them. As IMORE...

Salt of the earth people

A few Sundays back the Gospel was centered on “salt of the earth” and “light for the world” images. Familiar concepts, not all that earth-shattering or snazzy—We are salt and light. That’s a good thing. Go out there and be one of those two. Or both. End of sermon…. Not at our church that day. As part of her homily, our pastor invited us to think about “salt of the earth” people. The folks whoMORE...

Remembering who you are

When I’m down on myself—not fully appreciating who I am at this time in life—it’s usually because I’ve forgotten who I have been. Trying to claw my way out of the generalized anxiety that characterizes our society, I’m sometimes not able to rekindle my best self—a fully-functioning creature of God’s own hand. Some of that occurs because I am not fully connected to what God has accomplishedMORE...

Wise elder advice

That’s the invitation seen on a booth at a recent Senior Center event in Amherst, MA. Located at the Amherst College library, this interactive display was sponsored by the Center and the college’s chapter of Rotaract, the young adult branch of the Rotary Club. The intent was simple: To invite conversations between Amherst students and senior citizens in town. The signs on the booth advertisedMORE...

Sine nomine

According to supposed generational characteristics, I function inside the crease between The Silent and Baby Boomer generations. To say that another way, I don’t fit either description. That’s why I prefer to think of my generational self with the same moniker as the tune for the hymn “For All the Saints”—sine nomine (literally “without a name” in Latin). I now consider myself an older adult. NoMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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