Category

Relationships

This category brings together any blogs that comment on the relationships that exist among older adults, as well as their relationships with people in younger age groups.  Some of these relationships are full, rich and rewarding, while others need effort and prayer. In all cases, relationships keep older adults healthy, spiritually mature and purposed.

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Knowing old people

I’ve been thinking how to be helpful in a situation that you may have encountered, too: The possibility that some young adults might not really know very many old folks. Their attitudes are positive, their intentions toward us are beyond reproach and their knowledge about older adults fairly accurate. But what may yet be lacking are firsthand interactions with elderly folks—both a foundation andMORE...

One perspective on caregiving

  I want to speak with those of you who are caring for elderly loved ones, perhaps finding it more difficult than you imagined. Not to give you advice—you probably get enough of that already—or to provide you with more information—you may be overwhelmed with that, too. Instead, let me share with you my own experiences with frail elderly folks—including my mother—as one way of telling youMORE...

Oldsters and youngsters

  (The following entry features the insights of students in the Language Arts and Humanities Class at Briar Glen School in Glen Ellyn, IL. My thanks to these thoughtful youngsters for their wisdom about oldsters!) I recently had the opportunity to talk with a small group of fifth graders about the benefits that come to youngsters and oldsters when they interact with each other. TheMORE...

Renewing old congregations

  If you’re an (older adult) leader in an (older adult) congregation, you want your congregation to stay strong and vital. Here I’d like to share with you the possibility that your congregation could continue to exist—even thrive—precisely because of the presence and passions of older members. To say that another way: Just as fullness of years is possible for each of you personally, so thisMORE...

They deserve to know….

  It’s likely that your life has been packed with the blessings given to you by mentors, coaches, teachers, sponsors, counselors, pastors, youth group leaders, employers, supervisors and other people who helped you become who you are today. They deserve to know how their investment in your life turned out! Few of these individuals expect to know the eventual results of their efforts on yourMORE...

Whatever happened to…?

  A few years back, my high school graduating class celebrated our fiftieth anniversary with a reunion. It was a fully satisfying event, and I came away full of gratitude for these folks—who they were back then and who they are now. During the get-together, we wondered about the classmates that weren’t with us, and what has transpired in their lives. “Whatever happened to (fill in theMORE...

Celebrating older birthdays

  Some older adults I know profess a lack of interest in celebrating their birthdays in any significant way. This attitude may come from their feeling that there’s not much to celebrate once you come to a certain age plateau. So it could seem pointless to observe a birth anniversary—“It’s just not that important how old I am.” Other possibilities: Not wanting others to make a fuss about youMORE...

Been there….

  At this point in our lives, it can feel good to state—with some authority—that we’ve “been there.” This is a shorthand way of saying that the depth and breadth of our life histories might be valuable for others. That the accumulation of our skills and experiences might also name our enduring practical wisdom. Recalling this truth about our lives may equip us to be story-tellers of highMORE...

Who’s in charge? (Redux)

Previously I shared some thoughts about describing responsibilities as caregivers anticipate the needs of their frail elderly parents. In this entry, I approach the same question, this time from the viewpoint of an older adult who wants to invite adult children—or other caregivers—into a beginning conversation about my possible needs. The following personal observations and experiences come toMORE...

Who’s in charge?

As you anticipate caring for a frail elderly person—or seeking care yourself—it may be wise to ask (and answer) the simple question, “Who will be in charge?” It makes sense to address this matter as part of elder care conversations now. Events in my life over the past two decades have sharpened that question and broadened possible answers. Consider this invitation to join in a two-partMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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