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Relationships

This category brings together any blogs that comment on the relationships that exist among older adults, as well as their relationships with people in younger age groups.  Some of these relationships are full, rich and rewarding, while others need effort and prayer. In all cases, relationships keep older adults healthy, spiritually mature and purposed.

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Being kind

This is the final entry in a series of posts that come from the gift of a magnetic bumper sticker given to me at a North Carolina retreat for older adults. The message was simple and compelling: BE SILLY. BE HONEST. BE KIND. The surprising author of this surprising quote: Ralph Waldo Emerson. Yep, that one…. Does the world around you feel kind? Maybe the Pollyanna part of me is working here, butMORE...

Being honest

This entry is the second part of a series inspired by a Ralph Waldo Emerson quote: BE SILLY. BE HONEST. BE KIND. If you follow either Chris or me as we drive, you’ll see this helpful message on a magnetic bumper sticker. Honesty may seem to be in short supply these days. Not just at the highest rungs of the political ladder, but perhaps also invisibly spread through various sectors of leadershipMORE...

Being silly

This entry begins a three-part series inspired by a quote from Ralph Waldo Emerson: BE SILLY. BE HONEST. BE KIND. This helpful reminder is the message on a magnetic bumper sticker that was the gift of another workshop leader at this past year’s 50Forward retreat at Lutheridge Camp in Asheville, NC. Thanks, Laura! From the time I was a youngster visiting shut-in’s with my mother, I learned thatMORE...

Terms of endearment

Recently it occurred to me that I usually hear the elders I visit called only by their first names. That got me to wondering whether these good people ever heard the sweet and loving names that they remember from their earlier years. Terms of endearment that their parents, lovers, partners, friends or children used to address them. The private names that carry relationships into close, enduringMORE...

An older Christmas 2

In yesterday’s entry I shared some of my memories of childhood Christmas celebrations and traditions. Today I’d like to think alongside you about engaging in similar recollections with your beloved elders—one way to bring them the gift of your presence! As I was assembling yesterday’s thoughts, I started to wonder how you and I could engage our beloved elders in satisfying conversations aboutMORE...

An older Christmas 1

Those of us who are older bring to this season strong memories of Christmas Past—for most of us nothing to be afraid of…. The nostalgia that Christmas brings might be an especially fruitful place to visit alongside older friends and relatives. “How did you used to celebrate Christmas?” can call forth a wonderful array of customs and activities, each wrapped in fascinating stories that drawMORE...

I know a guy….

  One of the most rewarding aspects of life can be the connections we have with other people. “I know a guy…” is one way of describing these relationships. You and I may know a lot of men and women whose character and capabilities we admire. The longer we live, the more of these folks we know. At first glance they seem ordinary, but when we know them a little better, we realize how theyMORE...

The end is near II

The entries for yesterday and today look at the idea of “endings”, and how we might react to that idea as it plays out in our lives. Today: How endings effect my spirit. As I move through my seventh decade of life I’m more and more intrigued how ending-ideas worm their way into my thoughts. The current seasons of the calendar and liturgical years nudge me to make sense of these matters. Not justMORE...

The colorful people we are

Colorful people like you and me can serve a purpose. That’s one of the thoughts that UCLA psychology professor Alan Castel shares in his new book, Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging. Castel notes that his interest in gerontology started when he was a child, spending considerable time with older relatives—many of them genuinely unique characters who displayed traits thatMORE...

Second-shift worker ministry?

A recent edition of Christianity Today features a cover article worth reading—and perhaps considering as part of your personal ministry. The author is Jeff Haanen, CEO of the Denver Institute for Faith & Work. His premise is forceful: Honoring work as a place of ministry can get narrowed down to only one kind of worker, leaving out people whose occupations are difficult at best andMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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