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Relationships

This category brings together any blogs that comment on the relationships that exist among older adults, as well as their relationships with people in younger age groups.  Some of these relationships are full, rich and rewarding, while others need effort and prayer. In all cases, relationships keep older adults healthy, spiritually mature and purposed.

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Emulsifying elders

At a racial unity Bible study a few nights ago, I learned a new way to think about the power of older Christians to bring people together. Pastor and author *Tony Evans has offered the metaphor of **emulsion to describe how God’s people can bring together disparate or disagreeing groups of people. As I understand the chemistry, emulsifiers enable the identities of two different substances to beMORE...

Parenting that never stops

My parents always worried about me. (After Chris and I were married, those thoughts included her.) My father’s key question was usually, “Do you have enough money?” and my mother’s queries usually centered on being healthy. They held onto those parenting instincts throughout my adulthood. The present situation—the economy, COVID-19, the political maelstrom—seems to be heightening my own olderMORE...

Diminishing guru mojo?

A classic cartoon genre features a mountaintop sage interacting with a wisdom seeker. The captions spell out possible absurdities in those interactions—seekers or gurus engaged in humorous missteps. Something similar may occur when those of us who are older—sometimes considered to be sage-like—don’t quite measure up to the hopes of those who seek our counsel. That’s how I’m beginning to feelMORE...

No pushovers

  If you’re the kind of punk, coward or miscreant—or perhaps a police officer—who thinks it’s okay to knock over old people, this word: We’re not your pushovers. Sure, we’re easy targets—our canes, walkers, stooped shoulders or shuffling gaits give us away—but that doesn’t mean we deserve your brand of violence. When you knock us over—for whatever reasons—it may seem that we lose: We stumbleMORE...

Salvage

  For a couple of weeks, salvage has been following me around like a kitten looking for a home. Sometimes unobtrusive and at other times almost in my face, this word has gradually wormed its way into my conscious thoughts. Some of them follow here. Salvage is derived from salvare, the Latinate root for salvation. The 17th century noun form first designated the payment offered for saving aMORE...

Keep talking

Keep talking “Like father, like son.” If that’s true, I have inherited my father’s enjoyment of shared conversations with friends and colleagues. (My mother’s descriptive noun for him was Schnatterpeter—a Low German phrase meaning something like “one who likes to talk with others about relatively ordinary matters, a chatterbox.”) To the consternation of those around me, when I schnatter, I don’tMORE...

Who is that masked man (or woman)?

My wife and I are mask-wearers. When we cover our faces in public, people may wonder, “Who’s behind those masks?” *The Lone Ranger, one of my all-time radio favorites, got that same reaction; people wanted to know who he was under that disguise. This pandemic may set up the same question about us. At first glance, our face coverings identify us in two ways: On the one hand—as senior citizens—weMORE...

Keeping in touch

Because of widespread concerns about COVID-19, physical touching now brings special considerations to my life. I can’t touch my face—germs might sneak into my nose. Touching others during the Greeting of Peace is not medically advised. (See earlier note about shifty viruses.) I am cautioned not to come in contact with surfaces that are not yet cleansed of viral microorganisms. “SocialMORE...

Just counting: A story

A few days ago, our English as a Second Language (ESL) program hosted an informative presentation regarding Census2020. The tutors and the students learned about the process and the content of this nation-wide plan for counting everyone in the United States. The program, presented in English and translated into Arabic and Amharic, provided all of us what we need in anticipation of receiving theMORE...

Winking out

Today I just want to share a sad part of growing older: Dealing with the loss of those near and dear. Specifically, those beloved elders from my past who seem to disappear suddenly, like twinkling stars that wink out without much of a trace. This has occurred to me earlier in life—teachers, friends and mentors who have died or descended into illnesses that prohibit communication with them. As IMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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