Category

Soul Searchings

Entries in this category probe deeper thoughts about old age. Spirituality, self-image, relationships, hopes and yearnings — all the stuff of self-talk and core meaning for people who are older.

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Old fools near and far

  “The only thing worse than a fool is an old fool.” So goes a maxim that was easy to believe when I was younger—it didn’t apply to me. Not so these days—when the folly of older men seems to be front-and-center in the news. Yes, much of the stupidity of sexual predation can be blamed on genuine jerks. But some of these older fellows have also exhibited garden-variety foolhardiness: They’veMORE...

Rethinking prophetic work

  I’ve been reading Isaiah again. One of the things I’ve noticed is that Isaiah—or several “Isaiahs”—seems to be bothered by more than apostasy, heresy or idolatry. Something else is grabbing and shaking his (their) soul. It seems to me that Isaiah is also railing at the breakdown of the social fabric—in Judah and Israel, but extending to the various empires adjoining the limited geographyMORE...

Ashamed about bodily functions

  One of the things I know about getting older is that eventually some of my bodily functions will stop working very well. This will likely be embarrassing. I can imagine the day when someone might have to feed, wipe or clean me up, when they will talk to me about basic body functions that just aren’t what they should be. I’ve thought about matters like drooling, spilling food or makingMORE...

Little (old) kindnesses

  When I was younger, I noticed how older relatives would apologize for the size or significance of their gifts. Given that prompting, I agreed: Their presents were usually small, barely appropriate to my childhood dreams. Nothing big nor exciting came from their generosity. In my hedonistic or materialistic mindset, a gift was good only when it was big, surprising, unique, fashionable andMORE...

How will they know?

The older you get, the less most folks know about you. Two reasons: There are fewer people around you who have known you for awhile. And you probably don’t go around bragging about your history—work, family, adventures, accomplishments, roles, extraordinary knowledge or skills. For those reasons, nothing special about you sticks out in most folks’ minds—and so you are stuck inside only oneMORE...

Bread on the waters

  I still like the semi-quirky verbiage of the King James Version. I especially enjoy its translation of Ecclesiastes 11:1. “Cast thy bread upon the waters: for thou shalt find it after many days.” In most commentaries, “bread” is explained as “the stuff from which bread is made”–grain of one kind or the other. “The waters” could be anything from rivers to flooded fields. In allMORE...

Whom do you trust?

This blog is part of an ongoing series that answers an intriguing question: What might it mean for older adults to claim that they are still “fearfully and wonderfully made?”   Eventually someone else is going to want to know more about your body or brain. That person could be your spouse, a medical professional, a counselor or pastor, or even a dear friend. They love you and want to beMORE...

Thanks for nothing

  No, really, God…. I mean it. I want to thank you for absolutely nothing. That may sound odd—something is usually better than nothing. At the start and end of my life, “nothing” will characterize me. “Having nothing” is the way I arrived into this world—naked and crying about starting my new life outside the protection of my mother’s body. And as you know, dear Lord, it’s the way I’llMORE...

Scruffy hat, scruffy guy

  If you met me on the street, you might mistake me for someone whose mother didn’t teach him how to present himself in a tidy and respectable matter. At this stage in life, I accept that possibility, because I am perfectly content with old clothes, a battered baseball cap and uncombed eyebrows. (Some of you old guys out there may know what I mean, right?) On one hand, this phenomenon is notMORE...

A key to understanding theodicy

  Today let’s explore one feature of the Christian theological landscape: The irksome questions that swarm around theodicy. How can an All-Powerful God allow evil to happen? Does God not care about evil ? Is God actually NOT all that powerful? I will NOT be parsing this doctrine here. Instead, let me suggest something a bit different: You could be the key for some folks to understand howMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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