Category

Soul Searchings

Entries in this category probe deeper thoughts about old age. Spirituality, self-image, relationships, hopes and yearnings — all the stuff of self-talk and core meaning for people who are older.

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The deteriorating shower house

  Our mountain home’s shower house is falling apart. Granted, it’s over 75 years old and has been in gradual decline for several decades. But older buildings shouldn’t just deteriorate like that—they’re supposed to be a symbol of stability and permanence in a world that always seems to be disassembling itself. To be direct: I don’t like to see this legacy building—on our family’s heritageMORE...

Spirituality and chronic illness

  For several years I’ve been working with an occupational therapist on the question: How could spirituality re-emerge as a vital part of this profession? This entry examines one part of that search: How might chronic illness diminish a person’s spiritual self? (Also implied: How might spirituality help diminish the debilitating circumstances of a chronic illness or disability?) SomeMORE...

Been there….

  At this point in our lives, it can feel good to state—with some authority—that we’ve “been there.” This is a shorthand way of saying that the depth and breadth of our life histories might be valuable for others. That the accumulation of our skills and experiences might also name our enduring practical wisdom. Recalling this truth about our lives may equip us to be story-tellers of highMORE...

A hypocrite’s hope

  When I was a young lad, I learned that hypocrisy is a bad attribute. Jesus did not like hypocrites—mostly leaders who were not practicing true religion. In high school, I was taught an added fact: Most of us are hypocrites in one way or the other, me included. Now hypocrisy came home, but with a double-standard irony: Others’ duplicity was easier to see and condemn than my own. SomeMORE...

Frozen fashion?

  This entry presents another perspective on a perhaps-puzzling later-in-life matter: Those older folks whose apparel and personal appearance may seem frozen in time. First, the phenomenon—one you may observe in others OR a way of life you’re starting to adopt: Patterns of clothing, shoes, grooming, jewelry or accessories that might suggest that they or you may have stopped caring aboutMORE...

Decluttering decluttering

  Somewhere along the line, this blog shifted out from under my grasp. I fully intended to spotlight the best-selling book, The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning, a newer entry in the growing field of decluttering. The more I thought about the subject, the more it skittered away from easy definitions or explanations. This made me wonder if I needed to straighten up decluttering in my ownMORE...

A modest proposal

  All “modest proposals” usually start with modest questions. So take this title as a sign that I’m not sure how to write about a current situation that may be vexing you and me. The matter: The continuing anxiety I feel when confronted or assaulted by political news of the day or moment. To be specific, the ways in which otherwise thoughtful and righteous folks have yielded their moralMORE...

Who’s in charge? (Redux)

Previously I shared some thoughts about describing responsibilities as caregivers anticipate the needs of their frail elderly parents. In this entry, I approach the same question, this time from the viewpoint of an older adult who wants to invite adult children—or other caregivers—into a beginning conversation about my possible needs. The following personal observations and experiences come toMORE...

Finding profundity

At this time in life, I continue to seek profundity. In the ideas, thoughts and words that come my way, as well as the thoughts and words that I express. Perhaps you’ve thought the same: Wishing for spirituality, wisdom or life purpose that doesn’t float in the shallows of intellect, knowledge or honesty—like intellectual/spiritual flotsam and jetsam. Not always being satisfied with surfaceMORE...

Resilience revisited

At this stage in life, we are often reminded to be “resilient”. This trait is supposed evidence of other desirable personality characteristics that we can carry throughout our lives—determination, flexibility, buoyancy, even lightheartedness. This thought is well-intentioned: What lasting good comes from giving up on life goals, other people, hope or your most basic qualities? Staying strong, inMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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