Category

Time

In this category are Full of Years blogs that examine how time fills the lives of older persons. Time as a gift and time as a responsibility. Implicit in all entries: This is a good time to be living fully.

T

The upside of today’s downsides

(Today’s entry finds its inspiration in the *October 20, 2019 column by Pulitzer Prize-winning Chicago Times columnist Mary Schmich, “What if this time of chaos is the beginning of something better?” .) It’s not news that we live in more-than-interesting times—they’re downright difficult, actually. All around us—sometimes inside of us—fear, confusion, anger and depression seem stronger than weMORE...

Elderly exegetics – November 2019

  Today’s entry continues a series of short musings about lectionary texts that may soon appear in your line-of-sight. These entries may prove helpful in interpreting a Sunday’s appointed lessons with sensitivity to the realities faced by those who are older. November Background It seems appropriate to look at biblical texts from the viewpoint of older adults, who were among the originalMORE...

Holy hagiography!

One of the new books on top of my work desk is a Roman Catholic *hagiography that walks readers through a year of celebration of the lives and witness of acknowledged saints. These stories of historical heroes whose lives have given hope and courage to Christians for years. You might want to consider how reading about saints could inform your own spiritual well-being. That’s what happens for meMORE...

Twice is nice

Wise sayings stick in my mind, some from when I was young: “Measure twice, cut once” was my father’s advice when addressing a piece of lumber with a saw. STOP/LOOK/LISTEN was emblazoned on all railroad crossings, especially those without gates and flashing lights. “Look both ways before crossing the road” was my parents’ advice about walking to school. (When I started driving, those words laterMORE...

Refilling evaporated purpose

Pursuing an identifiable mission, vocation or calling is good for you. *Some recent research has shown that a practiced sense of purpose contributes as much to longevity as exercise. Although the parameters of “sense of purpose” can be loosely defined, the conclusion of researchers was definite: **”Finding a direction for life, and setting overarching goals for what you want to achieve can helpMORE...

Ageless wisdom?

As I head into the later decades of my life, I consider wisdom as one of the gifts of aging. Years of experience, countless relationships, unfettered time and still-bubbling curiosity can combine to bend my soul towards insightful living that could be useful. I think of it as ageless because I’m passing on the legacy of other’s knowledge. Most of what I consider wise comes directly from the mindMORE...

Lingering memories

The longer I live, the more memories I have stored up. This truism about older adulthood comes with a slight twist: It might become harder for me to dwell on any single memory. Each recollection —rich in its depth and satisfaction—can compete with the others for my attention, time and energy. There are good reasons to hold on to a specific memory for more than a few seconds. Any of myMORE...

Climate Conversation 6: Emotional responses

Today’s entry is part of an occasional set of observations about changes in the world’s climate that will affect all of us, old and young alike. The series bends toward a key question: As God’s people, how should we respond? Today’s entry: Dealing with our emotions. All decisions start with emotions. That’s one way to characterize how neurobiologists think about changing our behaviors. (RationalMORE...

Old hands

As long ago as my high school years, I’ve been told that I had strong hands. Because I played the piano and organ back then, I always thought of this as a compliment. My own appraisal: They were old hands—long, skinny, bony, wrinkled and ridged with bulging blood vessels, tendons and musculature. Oddly enough, some folks thought of my hands as one of my strange charms. (When you’re balding, youMORE...

Old stuff

  In our basement there’s a closet that holds the really old stuff of our lives. Some of it’s necessary—income tax forms for the past ten years—but much of it is just old: My collection of organ and piano music—a relic of the time in my life when that was my passionate capability. Photos from my parents’ early days. Home decorations from Chris and my first apartments. Our college-eraMORE...

Avatar

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

Recent Posts

Blog Topics

Archives

Get in touch

Share your thoughts about the wonder of older years—the fullness of this time in life—on these social media sites.

Receive Updates by Email

* indicates required