Category

Time

In this category are Full of Years blogs that examine how time fills the lives of older persons. Time as a gift and time as a responsibility. Implicit in all entries: This is a good time to be living fully.

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The multitude formers

  *The Family of Man–the classic coffee-table book whose photographs and captions inspire us to cherish the universal qualities of humanity–ends with photographs of couples from around the world. The caption that characterizes all of these forebears: “We two form a multitude.” The message is clear: Whether in marriages, friendships or kinships of any kind, bonds of love produceMORE...

The day is coming

  From what I hear, probably the most difficult adjustment at this stage in life comes when our car keys or driver’s license are taken away. (I’m pretty sure that very few of us voluntarily relinquish this all-important element of our independent living!) The giving up of a car may arise from a near or actual crisis, and it likely precipitates others that seem far worse. I write this entryMORE...

Bread on the waters

  I still like the semi-quirky verbiage of the King James Version. I especially enjoy its translation of Ecclesiastes 11:1. “Cast thy bread upon the waters: for thou shalt find it after many days.” In most commentaries, “bread” is explained as “the stuff from which bread is made”–grain of one kind or the other. “The waters” could be anything from rivers to flooded fields. In allMORE...

A key to understanding theodicy

  Today let’s explore one feature of the Christian theological landscape: The irksome questions that swarm around theodicy. How can an All-Powerful God allow evil to happen? Does God not care about evil ? Is God actually NOT all that powerful? I will NOT be parsing this doctrine here. Instead, let me suggest something a bit different: You could be the key for some folks to understand howMORE...

How to grow old?

    Perhaps I missed it—I read mostly non-fiction—but I could really use a story with a title something like This is How You Age Well. A tale of inspiring, even epic proportions. Sound familiar? If so, you may also appreciate the other side of that narrative: YOU may be a good teacher for others who want to understand how to move into their older years with grace and satisfaction. EvenMORE...

A memories jar

Most of us want to be remembered after we’ve died. Many of us might not think about the value of our leaving behind some artifacts—memories embedded in memorable items—that will help others continue their fond memories of us. (Remember that tender reminiscences can be powerful motivations for behaviors that emulate what a dearly departed friend or relative embodied.) Suzy Strunk of suburbanMORE...

Waiting Room Redemption

I spend significant time in the waiting rooms of my several doctors. It struck me recently that this was a time that could be repurposed for godly purposes, and hence redeemed! The time in a waiting room time can be a way to restore spirits, dispel distressing emotions or rescue your fullest spiritual identity. People watching prayers The weight of illnesses or continuing medical conditions sitsMORE...

Pay now or pay later

“You reap what you sow”—is a lifestyle axiom that exists in almost all religious traditions. At this time of life, we’re “paying later”—dealing with the consequences of actions or inactions that took place long ago. It’s a tough part of being older, an expected phenomenon that’s still irksome. (Some examples: We didn’t floss when we were younger, and now the endodontist is our new best friendMORE...

Another Greatest Generation?

I’ve just finished viewing the PBS series, The VietNam War, and have come to this thought: Those of you who served the country during this time—whether or not in combat, whether or not willingly—may be America’s next “Greatest Generation.” Looking at the world and life through the eyes of the men and women in the documentary, I’m pretty sure that we may have underestimated your importance to ourMORE...

Fearfully and wonderfully made 1.35

This blog is part of an ongoing series that answers this simple question: What might it mean for older adults to claim that they are still “fearfully and wonderfully made?” Today I want to invite you into a neurological universe called “neurogenesis,” which you will remember from Biology 101 in high school. (Actually, you WON’T remember this amazing capability of the [older] adult brain, becauseMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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