Category

Time

In this category are Full of Years blogs that examine how time fills the lives of older persons. Time as a gift and time as a responsibility. Implicit in all entries: This is a good time to be living fully.

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The deteriorating shower house

  Our mountain home’s shower house is falling apart. Granted, it’s over 75 years old and has been in gradual decline for several decades. But older buildings shouldn’t just deteriorate like that—they’re supposed to be a symbol of stability and permanence in a world that always seems to be disassembling itself. To be direct: I don’t like to see this legacy building—on our family’s heritageMORE...

Too soon we grow old…

  Now that I have your attention—perhaps you were thinking that this entry would offer a plaintive sadness about the slow departure of youthfulness?—let me come clean: What I really hope we can think about together is the second section of the Pennsylvania Dutch aphorism: “Too late we grow smart!” While the first part of the saying is always true—who can avoid the inevitability of aging?—theMORE...

They deserve to know….

  It’s likely that your life has been packed with the blessings given to you by mentors, coaches, teachers, sponsors, counselors, pastors, youth group leaders, employers, supervisors and other people who helped you become who you are today. They deserve to know how their investment in your life turned out! Few of these individuals expect to know the eventual results of their efforts on yourMORE...

Whatever happened to…?

  A few years back, my high school graduating class celebrated our fiftieth anniversary with a reunion. It was a fully satisfying event, and I came away full of gratitude for these folks—who they were back then and who they are now. During the get-together, we wondered about the classmates that weren’t with us, and what has transpired in their lives. “Whatever happened to (fill in theMORE...

When it’s time to give up

I’ve watched this feeling grow in some older adults who I have known well: They finally get tired of the work of staying alive, and just give up. What I have also seen: the difficulty of bringing up this matter with those around them. How do any of us tell those who love us that we’re ready to die? What words do we use? What will our loved ones be ready to hear? How do we broach the subjectMORE...

Old and (still) loving

When my spouse and I were courting, and had come to the point of being pretty sure we wanted to spend our lives together, we would sometimes imagine what it would be like to be in love at some advanced age in our future. Rocking chairs on the porch was always our go-to image, spring or summer the imagined season and comforting coziness the ambience with which we would enjoy those loving timesMORE...

The long arm of history

  The older I get, the more the long arm of history seems to touch me. Born in the previous century, I have the sense that I’m supposed to do more than just acknowledge the guiding hands of yesteryear. The longer I live, the more I feel the responsibility to be a steward of the past, helping ensure that current generations don’t live as though there is nothing valuable to be learned fromMORE...

Full of what?

Late in his life, my father would often comment, “Getting old isn’t for sissies.” This was his way of reminding himself and the rest of us that fullness of years isn’t a walk in the park. It was my father’s voice—and witness—that came to mind when I started these blogs. It would be easy to think of fullness-of-years as code language for an older-adult version of the prosperity gospel—as thoughMORE...

Losing our edge

Over the years I’ve noticed how some esteemed church leaders gradually lose their edge. However that process begins, it starts to become noticeable as their small mistakes proliferate. A missed word here, a momentary lapse in judgement there—and after awhile it’s apparent that these formerly great trailblazers are heading towards the time when they won’t be very effective any more. When tinyMORE...

Groundhog Day Questions

  The now-classic film, Groundhog Day, poses deep philosophical questions about life. One that still puzzles me—that applies especially to this time in my life—is whether the repetitive cycling of similar days is something good or something not-so-good. To say that another way: Now that I’m older, how should I think about a lifestyle in which each day is nearly a copy of all that precededMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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