Category

Time

In this category are Full of Years blogs that examine how time fills the lives of older persons. Time as a gift and time as a responsibility. Implicit in all entries: This is a good time to be living fully.

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Terms of endearment

Recently it occurred to me that I usually hear the elders I visit called only by their first names. That got me to wondering whether these good people ever heard the sweet and loving names that they remember from their earlier years. Terms of endearment that their parents, lovers, partners, friends or children used to address them. The private names that carry relationships into close, enduringMORE...

An older Christmas 1

Those of us who are older bring to this season strong memories of Christmas Past—for most of us nothing to be afraid of…. The nostalgia that Christmas brings might be an especially fruitful place to visit alongside older friends and relatives. “How did you used to celebrate Christmas?” can call forth a wonderful array of customs and activities, each wrapped in fascinating stories that drawMORE...

A voice in the wilderness

One of Advent’s most haunting texts is the one about “A voice crying in the wilderness, ‘Prepare ye the way of the Lord!’” This quiet passage (Isaiah 40:3) has always tugged at my soul because I’ve imagined some person out there in the middle of nowhere—wildernesses are tough places to live—yelling out loud about something important. In the outback places of life—any wilderness is out thereMORE...

The end is near II

The entries for yesterday and today look at the idea of “endings”, and how we might react to that idea as it plays out in our lives. Today: How endings effect my spirit. As I move through my seventh decade of life I’m more and more intrigued how ending-ideas worm their way into my thoughts. The current seasons of the calendar and liturgical years nudge me to make sense of these matters. Not justMORE...

The end is near I

The entries for today and tomorrow look at the concept of “endings”, and how we might react to that idea as it plays out in our lives. Today: Some concept exploration…. The title above, evocative of scores of cartoons, is also familiar emotional territory for older adults. Endings of any kind may seem to gather like lifespan sentries, silently watching as we move toward conclusive events andMORE...

A mystic sweet communion

Every time I sing that phrase—in the final verse of ”The Church’s One Foundation” by Samuel Stone—I choke up just a bit. Those few words remind me of a sweet truth: By God’s grace, and because I am old now, I am connected to multitudes of folks like you! And what’s even sweeter is that I don’t have to wait for St. John’s vision in Revelations 7 eventually to come to pass. There is a “mystic sweetMORE...

How much longer?

Like a happy puppy, another birthday just galumphed up next to me, doing its best to get my attention. Again this year, I am glad to consider the blessings of my past, my satisfaction with the present and my hopes for the future. As the total years of my life add more and more numerals, it becomes a frequent feature of my waking moments to ask, “How much longer?” The question can serve as aMORE...

Lessons from the natural world: Active, extinct or dormant?

  In these later decades of life, I have come to see even more fully the value of being immersed in the natural world. The lessons I learn from being among nature’s small and large wonders form the basis of this series of blogs. Today’s thought: How we who are older might compare ourselves to volcanoes…. Several times in life I’ve had the opportunity to explore a variety of geologicalMORE...

The deteriorating shower house

  Our mountain home’s shower house is falling apart. Granted, it’s over 75 years old and has been in gradual decline for several decades. But older buildings shouldn’t just deteriorate like that—they’re supposed to be a symbol of stability and permanence in a world that always seems to be disassembling itself. To be direct: I don’t like to see this legacy building—on our family’s heritageMORE...

Too soon we grow old…

  Now that I have your attention—perhaps you were thinking that this entry would offer a plaintive sadness about the slow departure of youthfulness?—let me come clean: What I really hope we can think about together is the second section of the Pennsylvania Dutch aphorism: “Too late we grow smart!” While the first part of the saying is always true—who can avoid the inevitability of aging?—theMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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