Category

Time

In this category are Full of Years blogs that examine how time fills the lives of older persons. Time as a gift and time as a responsibility. Implicit in all entries: This is a good time to be living fully.

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After Memorial Day

This past Memorial Day an old memory of my father came back into focus. It had to do with his World War II military service. I think this collection of thoughts came about as I imagined the feelings of families whose loved ones have died while in uniform. Thinking about their losses recalled my father’s circumstances as a draftee right at the end of that war. Ed Sitze was already married and theMORE...

Guest writer observations

  (I had some more thoughts about the new words coming from *new writers. So I called myself a Guest Writer today because that makes me feel like one of them. And yes, I’m still impressed by their gifts!) I offer these further comments on the recent FullofYears blog, “Words abound.” I think I left out some other important observations about the blossoming of helpful thoughts that’s happeningMORE...

Words abound

For a few months now—especially since we all agreed to remain sequestered in our homes—something is happening to words. I’m not sure, but there seem to be more good words out there. In here, too. A good thing—renewed evidence that there’s still power in words. I’m noticing that there are a lot more people taking the time—and expending considerable effort—to cobble together, sculpt, throw on theMORE...

In my face

  It’s hard to ignore what’s right in front of me in these times. Good news: Self-sacrificing essential workers, wise governors, scientists and inventors. Not-so-good news: A world-wide plague, stubborn injustice, invisible danger and dangerous people, economic troubles. News, opinions, testimonies, stories, hard questions—all of them front-and-center at almost every waking moment. What’sMORE...

A really holy week

  Today’s entry started as a presumptive blog about how our observance of Holy Week this year might just match early Christian worship in Rome’s catacombs. When I read the historical background about this underground cemetery, though, I realized that my supposed good idea had no basis in fact. The early Christians used the catacombs less as settings for meetings or worship, and more often asMORE...

Lord know, we have the time….

My wife and I are coming to the end of our second week of COVID-19 stay-at-home living. Chris put this experience into perspective a few days ago, when we were deciding what to do together. “Lord knows, we have the time,” she observed. “We can artfully sculpt our time into a beautiful day.” To be honest with you, I’ve had trouble accepting the blessing of abundant time. On the one hand, the giftMORE...

What else is there to think about?

  Over the past week or so, I’ve been waiting for the coronavirus news to settle down. Here’s why: Whether out of prudence, trying to fill empty leadership niches or injecting trust and truth back into the emotional economy, leaders of all kinds have been filling my mailbox with assurances and information. I appreciate their thoughtfulness. This is probably a once-in-a-lifetime crisis, andMORE...

Elderly exegetics (February)

Today’s entry continues a series of short musings about lectionary texts that may soon appear in your line-of-sight. These thoughts may be helpful in interpreting the appointed lessons with sensitivity to the realities faced by those who are older. FEBRUARY Background It seems appropriate to look at biblical texts from the viewpoint of older adults, who were among the original writers, hearersMORE...

Fragile lives

Every so often, I am struck by how fragile our lives can be. So many of life’s difficult times begin with a startling moment that changes everything. With sometimes little warning, the exquisitely intricate facets of daily living can disappear suddenly. Lines that have bound us tightly to others fray and snap. Normal health dissipates in the face of sobering test results. An accident snuffs outMORE...

:Personal notes

This entry can be classified as personal privilege, one of those times when a writer sets aside conventions and the normal odor of things in order to add the fresh air of personal greetings to what would otherwise seem to be generic thoughts. This blog is not about any subject. If there was a file folder holding the following thoughts, it might be labeled, “Every time I think of you, I thank myMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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