Category

Words

The truth remains: Words enable or form thoughts. No words, no thoughts! This category contains Full of Years blogs that play with words. Those associated with old age, and those that add zest to living fully.

W

Words you can use

  One anchor maxim in neurolinguistics goes something like this: No words, no thoughts; know words, know thoughts. The implication is intriguing: The stronger your vocabulary, the more likely the depth and breadth of your thinking. These ideas may also apply to the ways in which you express ideas and ideals about older adults. Today I include an aggregation of words and phrases you might useMORE...

Thanks for nothing

  No, really, God…. I mean it. I want to thank you for absolutely nothing. That may sound odd—something is usually better than nothing. At the start and end of my life, “nothing” will characterize me. “Having nothing” is the way I arrived into this world—naked and crying about starting my new life outside the protection of my mother’s body. And as you know, dear Lord, it’s the way I’llMORE...

Storytelling with older adults

  Storytelling—theirs, yours, God’s–can be a pleasurable activity you share with older adults. I come from several generations of story-telling elders, so I love to wade into the stories that others tell, and those I spool out. Storytelling is a nearly-spiritual art that almost anyone can practice and enjoy. Although some stories can get out of hand—length, repetition, degradation ofMORE...

A key to understanding theodicy

  Today let’s explore one feature of the Christian theological landscape: The irksome questions that swarm around theodicy. How can an All-Powerful God allow evil to happen? Does God not care about evil ? Is God actually NOT all that powerful? I will NOT be parsing this doctrine here. Instead, let me suggest something a bit different: You could be the key for some folks to understand howMORE...

Beyond the first paragraph

  In a recently televised interview, author/columnist Thomas L. Friedman has coined an expression that calls for further reflection. He compared the dynamics of Brexit and the American presidential elections to following the advice of “someone who has no second paragraph.” His turn of phrase is clear: Some folks have few clues about what to do the morning after their viewpoint or candidateMORE...

Amazing!

  I’ve about had it up to here with all the “amazing old people” stories I see in the news. Old folks doing heroic things; sprightly elders still working; ancient ones who are being thoroughly and surprisingly with-it. At first glance, the stories seem complimentary or appreciative. Older adults who do amazing things deserve admiration. On the other hand—here’s where I get steamed—much ofMORE...

Initiating “The Conversation”

Somewhere along the aging timeline, “The Conversation” should take place: A heartfelt chat, discussion or exploration of the question of how Mom and/or Dad will be able to live well when they can’t take care of themselves in their home. Either parent might resist the conversation—it raises difficult realities that will certainly come to pass. But in many families the question may actually soundMORE...

How to talk with older saints

Many older adults may not experience meaningful, enjoyable conversations in their later years. The range of subjects can narrow, topics can repeat themselves and the necessities of old age can push away opportunities for informal chatting or earnest self-revelation. Want to liven up your times of conversation with older adults? See if any of these ideas might be useful: • Keep your conversationsMORE...

Pity this writer,please?

The impetus for my blatant appeal to your kindness comes from trying to write about you accurately and respectfully. I am talking about the difficulties that come when I use almost any term that might describe you! Let me illustrate… If I refer to you as a geezer, graybeard or codger, I am talking only about guys like my Great-uncle Harry, who shaved haphazardly, scared us kids with hisMORE...

Still smiling

How’s your smile these days? I ask this question because you may not realize all the good things that happen when you smile. Want to think about that with me for a bit here? (If so, you have to promise to smile while you’re reading this—a way of practicing for what comes next!) The basic smile anatomy: The zygomatic major and orbicularis oculi muscles interact so that the corners of your eyeMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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