Category

Words

The truth remains: Words enable or form thoughts. No words, no thoughts! This category contains Full of Years blogs that play with words. Those associated with old age, and those that add zest to living fully.

W

Salvage

  For a couple of weeks, salvage has been following me around like a kitten looking for a home. Sometimes unobtrusive and at other times almost in my face, this word has gradually wormed its way into my conscious thoughts. Some of them follow here. Salvage is derived from salvare, the Latinate root for salvation. The 17th century noun form first designated the payment offered for saving aMORE...

Keep talking

Keep talking “Like father, like son.” If that’s true, I have inherited my father’s enjoyment of shared conversations with friends and colleagues. (My mother’s descriptive noun for him was Schnatterpeter—a Low German phrase meaning something like “one who likes to talk with others about relatively ordinary matters, a chatterbox.”) To the consternation of those around me, when I schnatter, I don’tMORE...

Guest writer observations

  (I had some more thoughts about the new words coming from *new writers. So I called myself a Guest Writer today because that makes me feel like one of them. And yes, I’m still impressed by their gifts!) I offer these further comments on the recent FullofYears blog, “Words abound.” I think I left out some other important observations about the blossoming of helpful thoughts that’s happeningMORE...

Words abound

For a few months now—especially since we all agreed to remain sequestered in our homes—something is happening to words. I’m not sure, but there seem to be more good words out there. In here, too. A good thing—renewed evidence that there’s still power in words. I’m noticing that there are a lot more people taking the time—and expending considerable effort—to cobble together, sculpt, throw on theMORE...

A really holy week

  Today’s entry started as a presumptive blog about how our observance of Holy Week this year might just match early Christian worship in Rome’s catacombs. When I read the historical background about this underground cemetery, though, I realized that my supposed good idea had no basis in fact. The early Christians used the catacombs less as settings for meetings or worship, and more often asMORE...

BONUS FEATURE: Elderly Exegetics – April 2020

  Today’s entry continues a series of short musings about lectionary texts that may soon appear in your line-of-sight. These thoughts may be helpful in interpreting the appointed lessons with sensitivity to the realities faced by those who are older. APRIL 2020 Background This month brings worshippers into full contact with a pandemic whose character calls out even more strongly for theMORE...

Too small to think about….

In case you missed these barely-noticed elements of daily life in COVID-19 times, let me share below some things I’ve noticed lately. They may not warrant the full treatment of a blog posting, but still might deserve just an iota of your attention! *Iota Are there any large iotas? Could they add flavor to a kale salad? Is iota another name for dust bunnies? Will most iotas survive this pandemicMORE...

An abundance of caution

There’s a lot of caution going around now. Everywhere, it seems. As a preface for almost any announcement, caution-abundance carries the same amount of linguistic freight as the well-worn phrase, “We take (fill in the blanks) very seriously.” Assured by plentiful prudence, readers/viewers know that whatever they see/hear will be well-infused with the presumably admirable trait of caution. Lots ofMORE...

Keeping in touch

Because of widespread concerns about COVID-19, physical touching now brings special considerations to my life. I can’t touch my face—germs might sneak into my nose. Touching others during the Greeting of Peace is not medically advised. (See earlier note about shifty viruses.) I am cautioned not to come in contact with surfaces that are not yet cleansed of viral microorganisms. “SocialMORE...

Moreover well-aged

Sometimes a word gets stuck in my mind and won’t leave until I bathe it in other words. The process of my word-mulling sometimes takes awhile, which can result in a properly aged expression—let’s say, moreover?—ready for use in blogs for older adults! At its simplest, moreover means something like “And in addition…” That works in a Bible passage like, “Moreover, it is required of stewards thatMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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