Category

Words

The truth remains: Words enable or form thoughts. No words, no thoughts! This category contains Full of Years blogs that play with words. Those associated with old age, and those that add zest to living fully.

W

A hypocrite’s hope

  When I was a young lad, I learned that hypocrisy is a bad attribute. Jesus did not like hypocrites—mostly leaders who were not practicing true religion. In high school, I was taught an added fact: Most of us are hypocrites in one way or the other, me included. Now hypocrisy came home, but with a double-standard irony: Others’ duplicity was easier to see and condemn than my own. SomeMORE...

Decluttering decluttering

  Somewhere along the line, this blog shifted out from under my grasp. I fully intended to spotlight the best-selling book, The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning, a newer entry in the growing field of decluttering. The more I thought about the subject, the more it skittered away from easy definitions or explanations. This made me wonder if I needed to straighten up decluttering in my ownMORE...

Suddenly and surely frail

  If we live long enough, we eventually age into frailty. The imperfections and infirmities of old age gather at the perimeters of our daily lives—biding their time, respectful of our earlier elderliness, but also certain that they will eventually come into the center of our existence and self-images. That they will have their way with us. I have watched as this inevitable part of life hasMORE...

Two older adults walk into a bar…

Haven’t heard that one, hmmm? Perhaps because so much of the already-existing humor involving older folks is a lot more entertaining than this run-of-the-mill joke opener. In fact, you can enjoy older adult humor in daily newspaper comic strips—Brian Crane’s PICKLES () is my all-time favorite! Think of the working comedians who are themselves older adults. Comedic elder characters are a staple inMORE...

Finding profundity

At this time in life, I continue to seek profundity. In the ideas, thoughts and words that come my way, as well as the thoughts and words that I express. Perhaps you’ve thought the same: Wishing for spirituality, wisdom or life purpose that doesn’t float in the shallows of intellect, knowledge or honesty—like intellectual/spiritual flotsam and jetsam. Not always being satisfied with surfaceMORE...

Resilience revisited

At this stage in life, we are often reminded to be “resilient”. This trait is supposed evidence of other desirable personality characteristics that we can carry throughout our lives—determination, flexibility, buoyancy, even lightheartedness. This thought is well-intentioned: What lasting good comes from giving up on life goals, other people, hope or your most basic qualities? Staying strong, inMORE...

Portmanteaus proliferate

In my never-ending quest to put the experiences of older adults into new words, I am today challenging all readers to help invent some portmanteaus especially suited for this stage in life. This linguistic phenomenon occurs when two or more phonemes are combined to create a new word, sometimes with elements of a pun. So Tanzania came from smushing together parts of the names of its twoMORE...

Hypochondriac or hyped self-care?

We senior citizens are besieged with too many well-meaning health warnings and directives! From TV commercials and pop-up ads for new pharmacological wonders to the omnipresent reminders from our friends at AARP, there’s more than enough information about how we can avoid large problems and take care of what ails us. This deluge of information can help and harm me. On the one hand, I soak upMORE...

Quixotic elder

I’ve always wondered how it felt to be Don Quixote. He was an elderly fellow—50-ish, considered old in his time—when his self-appointed adventures began. Deemed insane, foolish or both, this self-designated knight took on a series of causes that, in his mind, were necessary for the well-being of others. His self-image can serve as a warning for any of us who imagine the importance of our lives inMORE...

Old and (still) loving

When my spouse and I were courting, and had come to the point of being pretty sure we wanted to spend our lives together, we would sometimes imagine what it would be like to be in love at some advanced age in our future. Rocking chairs on the porch was always our go-to image, spring or summer the imagined season and comforting coziness the ambience with which we would enjoy those loving timesMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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