Category

Words

The truth remains: Words enable or form thoughts. No words, no thoughts! This category contains Full of Years blogs that play with words. Those associated with old age, and those that add zest to living fully.

W

I don’t know

After years of life-experiences and advanced education, I know a lot. One of the most valuable things I know is that there are a lot of things I don’t know. At this time in my life, I’m finding more occasions where I lack knowledge. This truism became apparent during a recent trip Chris and I took to Costa Rica. Over and over again, we found out that much of what we were experiencing was totallyMORE...

In the dark

Ever experience total darkness? The kind where you literally can’t see your hand in front of your face? I’ve had experiences like that—in remote settings in another country, the inside of a cave and in my own home during a widespread power outage. I remember realizing that I couldn’t rely on my otherwise dependable eyes to help me determine where I was. Until the momentary panic dissolved, I feltMORE...

The mind of Christ

  I’ve always loved this concept—beautifully detailed in Philippians 2:1-11. The passage summarizes much of what Jesus was like, characteristics that place him on a pedestal of admiration, someone his followers—me included—hope to emulate. It has occurred to me recently that, because I’m an older adult now, I just might have a special vantage point for putting this “mind of Christ” idea intoMORE...

Parsing aches and pains

One of the challenges I face in growing older is discerning when to pay attention to hurts, twinges and discomforts that may or may not be signs of something serious. One reaction: To disregard all but the most persistent or painful problems. Another response—characterized as hypochondria—is to worry that each symptom is a warning sign of an underlying disease or malfunction. I live squarely inMORE...

Chronic old age?

  “Old age is a chronic condition.” So goes a supposedly clever bumper-sticker. The meaning seems clear: Being or getting old is like having a disease that won’t go away. As you might guess, I will spend the following paragraphs fuming at the concept behind this condensed negativity. First a look at “chronic”. Derived from chronos (time), it’s usually associated with something difficult thatMORE...

A *kvetching mine

I offer today’s entry as a small cornucopia for matters about which you and I might fuss. (Yes, I count myself as a sometimes-unrepentant sweater-about-small-stuff.) As with all of my blogs, this material is totally (1)legitimate and (2)authoritative, providing you the authority and legitimacy you need to pursue your own apprehension and complaining in new directions. (No, do not thank me—it onlyMORE...

The mind of Christ

I’ve always loved this concept—beautifully detailed in Philippians 2:1-11. The passage summarizes much of what Jesus was like, characteristics that place him on a pedestal of admiration, someone his followers—me included—try to emulate. It has occurred to me recently that, because I’m an older adult now, I might have a special vantage point for putting this “mind of Christ” idea into practiceMORE...

Who’s helping whom?

  I spent many years as an accompanist for choirs, soloists and presiding ministers who chant! One of the hardest parts of that work was to decide who was helping whom. The first rule for those who accompany—yes, there’s a metaphor coming soon here—is to match the singer’s tempo, volume and style as closely as possible. To meld into a unified musical voice—the accompanist helping the singerMORE...

Holy conversations

One of my enduring mantras goes something like this, “There’s no such thing as an idle conversation.” That’s why many of my verbal interchanges with other people end up being more than an exchange of pleasantries. In that vein of thinking, I’m pretty sure that there’s such a thing as “holy conversations,” those rare times when earnest exchanges become inspiring and inspired. It might even beMORE...

Holy hagiography!

One of the new books on top of my work desk is a Roman Catholic *hagiography that walks readers through a year of celebration of the lives and witness of acknowledged saints. These stories of historical heroes whose lives have given hope and courage to Christians for years. You might want to consider how reading about saints could inform your own spiritual well-being. That’s what happens for meMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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