Full of Years

If you value people who are older—and also your own aging—these entries will help you rejoice in the fullness of this stage of life: its gritty realities, secret joys, hidden spirituality and cherished moments—reasons to be grateful that old age is always a gift from God!

F

Latest Entries

Not welcome?

(This entry is part of an ongoing collection of blogs that examine the future of congregations post-COVID19. Each entry forms itself around a question looking for clarity or even answers.) In post-COVID congregations, some questions will remain for the people of God to wrestle with. One seems particularly important for the future of the Church: Who’s welcome and who isn’t? In most places, “AllMORE...

Servanthood revisited, Part 3

(Today’s thoughts close this series, bringing hopeful practicality to the theme: Christians are called to servanthood.) Good news remains: We can remain committed to lives of service. Service to God, not to the wealthy. Some personal reflections at this stage in life…. I have the power of speech. My servant-voice is still heard by others. At this time in life, I can be bold in private and publicMORE...

Servanthood revisited, Part 2

(The following thoughts continue a three-part consideration of the theme: Christians are called to servanthood. Today, the possibility that we may be unwilling servants of those who are extraordinarily wealthy.)   It’s possible that the Church’s current usage of “servant” may be more of a widely accepted 1metaphor than an exact match to biblical roles—perhaps an idea that also calls forMORE...

Servanthood revisited, Part 1

  (The following thoughts begin a three-part look at the theme: Servanthood among Christians. The subject may fea ture some unusual edges that are worth exploring,) This theological catch-phrase seems to have wide acceptance currently: We are called to be servants. Scriptures seem to invite that identity and it makes sense: Love your neighbor as yourself. Serve others as Jesus served. LetMORE...

Hope in a single Cheerio?

(This entry is part of an ongoing collection of blogs that examine the future of congregations post-COVID19. Each entry forms itself around a question looking for clarity or even answers.) Sometimes hope comes at me shyly, quietly. Asking for just a moment’s attention so that I don’t get hijacked by despair. That happened for me one recent Sunday in worship. From my seat near the front of theMORE...

What will happen to worship?

(This entry is part of an ongoing collection of blogs that examine the future of congregations post-COVID19. Each entry forms itself around a question looking for clarity or even answers.) Because of COVID19 cautions in our congregations, the theologies and practices of worship may have changed in substantial ways. To limit exposure to this harmful virus, we’ve shortened liturgies, suspendedMORE...

Not buying it, Mark!

Hey, Mr. Z! I thought you should know that I’m not buying into what your new Meta proposes, or what you’re trying to sell. Here’s the deal…. Your other enterprises have always felt like traps to me—seemingly innocent entertainments with seeming social benefits that may also be clever ways to insinuate your way into people’s  decisions, life purposes and identities. Meta feels the same way. IMORE...

Will they come back?

(This entry is part of an ongoing collection of blogs that examine the future of congregations post-COVID19. Each entry forms itself around a question looking for clarity or even answers.) Most congregations have been severely restricted in bringing members together physically for worship, fellowship, planning, support or service. The dangers of a relentless epidemic have reminded us how illnessMORE...

In the twinkling of an eye

With Advent on the horizon, this might be a good time to revisit one of its strong themes: The Second Coming. More specifically, how the world will end in the time it takes to *blink. The speed of this life-changing event will likely overwhelm or paralyze any effective reaction to what’s occurring.  Suddenly life as we know it will be finished and the events of Judgment Day—prefacing eternalMORE...

The church, reformed? (Back story)

The previous entry by the same title didn’t include some of the reasons why I would have the temerity to write about such a subject. These personal thoughts may help explain the coming blogs that are dedicated to the thesis that the people of God in the post-COVID church can (or should) engage in self-examination—with the audacity of reformers burnt into our souls by the flame of the Spirit. TheMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

Recent Posts

Blog Topics

Archives

Get in touch

Share your thoughts about the wonder of older years—the fullness of this time in life—on these social media sites.

Receive Updates by Email

* indicates required