Full of Years

If you value people who are older—and also your own aging—these entries will help you rejoice in the fullness of this stage of life: its gritty realities, secret joys, hidden spirituality and cherished moments—reasons to be grateful that old age is always a gift from God!

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Latest Entries

A social media metaphor?

COVID cave-dwelling has offered me opportunities to observe facets of daily life that might serve as useful metaphors or analogies. Today this example: Social media may be like *digital ant poison. See if my ant trap comparisons make sense…. Ant traps/baits contain deadly substances that don’t kill immediately. Scout ants smell and taste the traps’ wonderful flavor, and then head back to theMORE...

What about change?

Lately I’m having trouble with change. As one well-practiced in transformation, I wonder whether change per se is being over-sold just a bit. It wasn’t always this way. Decades ago, I learned from effective leaders and wise older mentors how change can (and cannot) happen. I’ve experienced change throughout my life. pursuing about a dozen careers, relocating to eight different parts of theMORE...

He that hath ears…

I think I may have discovered another unique advantage of growing older: Bigger, longer ears! The results of gravity’s pull, larger ears—and *noses, too—elongate because their underlying elasticity decreases over time. Aging cartilage, collagen and skin allow both women’s and men’s ears to get longer at the rate of .22 millimeters per year. The result: The longer you live, the longer your earsMORE...

Seeing grammar

Remember learning how to diagram sentences? That happened for me in 7th and 8th grade. During those years I figured out how to translate spoken or written language into exquisite charts that showed the relationships of words and clauses within the shape of an entire sentence. A speaker or writer could chart the size, complexity and inner-relationships of language. In this way, word structuresMORE...

Cursed be the binds that tie

If the centuries-old hymn is right—there are blessed ties that bind me to others —I wonder if there are also cursed binds that tie or obstruct me. Another way to consider the matter: What enwraps or impedes me so thoroughly that I can’t escape, and what can I do about these shackles or blockages? A first step: Name the bonds that entrap me or stop me cold. I can examine my unhealthy habits orMORE...

Celebrating Michael and All Angels

On September 29, we will once again celebrate this sometimes-hidden festival in the church year. At first glance, it’s a good day to think well of angels. This sometimes-overlooked occasion holds a lot more meaning, though, especially helpful in these times. Occurring close to the date of the autumnal equinox, this commemoration gives us the opportunity to gratefully acknowledge angelic creaturesMORE...

“Blest be the tie that binds”

The singing of this beloved hymn is often accompanied with tears. Its background story tells why: John Fawcett, a rural pastor in 18th century England, realized the mutual love between his congregation, his wife and himself. Instead of leaving for a better-paying position in London, he changed his mind at the last minute—after his farewell sermon—and chose to stay with this small, strugglingMORE...

Communion kits

During this continuing pandemic, worship in many places has included the use of Communion Kits. These prefilled communion cups hold in individually wrapped spaces a swallow of grape juice topped with a wafer. My reaction to their use has included grudging acceptance of their necessity in COVID times, and nagging displeasure about these substitutes for the sacramental elements of bread and wine. IMORE...

“Tool and die guy” retooled

Back in the day, “congregational tool and die guy” was my way of describing my role as a resource developer. Alongside other colleagues, I wrote workshop designs, constructed large-scale programs—e.g., The Pelican Project—and set up nation-wide resource introduction tours. The results: curricula, events, replicable workshops, booklets, videos and programs in stewardship, Christian educationMORE...

No joke

I don’t tell lawyer jokes. And I try to indicate my displeasure—not laughing—when someone tells one. Today’s thoughts spin out my reasoning. My emotions, too. A few days ago, a dear member of our congregation—we’ll call him Scott—died suddenly. He was a lawyer, highly regarded and beloved by clients and colleagues. He was born and raised around here, so his mourners have long histories that theyMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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