Category

Arcania

An odd category at first glance, this is the place where you can find odd facts, rocks you can turn over, minutia that’s important, wandering musings and rabbit trails to tempt you into different realms of thought. “Miscellany” might describe the category, and it might not….

A

Strange metaphors IV

This entry is part of an occasional series in which metaphorical ideas find their way onto your screen. Its roots are simple: When you look with fresh eyes, there may be life lessons to find in just about anything. Today: Unraveling or pruning? It’s tempting to think that life as we know it is unraveling. Current events seem to warrant that assumption: Russia’s war on Ukraine (and on the existingMORE...

An asset-based offer

(Today’s blog is different: It outlines a unique offer that might benefit your congregation’s leaders—insights and motivation that could arise from shared conversation about the book, Stewardshift: An Economia for Congregational Change. I can make the offer because I wrote the book….) THE BOOK It’s unlike most other books about “stewardship”: A rereading of the biblical roots and dimensions ofMORE...

Can I get a little pity here?

Based on my mind-melds with doctors whom I follow mindlessly—I’m talking Drs. Oz, Phil and Seuss—I am convinced that my psyche needs more pity. Raw, unadorned sympathy—the kind that has others thinking, “I may have it bad, but look at that miserable Bob Sitze—How does he find any joy in life?” To help elicit your kind commiseration, these details: Because I wear a mask for untold hours, I have toMORE...

Forgetful? Who, me?

Forgetfulness is one of the most bothersome aspects of growing older—the assumption that absent-mindedness is the first sign of mental decline among older citizens. Let me offer a different perspective. Many older adults are just a little slower on the uptake. When asked cognitive questions, codgers like me may take a split second longer to respond. Are my neurons firing at slower speeds, or isMORE...

The inertia of an object at rest

After our early morning exercise class, Chris and I take time for rest before going about our day. The hour of physical effort tires us out just enough to require some down time. But if we rest too long, 1inertia sets in, sometimes making it difficult to gather energy and will for what’s next. We live a fairly unscheduled calendar, so that’s not usually a problem. I’m a bit bothered, though, byMORE...

In praise of watchers

In ancient times, watchers guarded cities in the dark of night, surveying their territory from their posts on walls or high towers. Their job was critical: Watch and listen for danger, and then warn the rest of us! Old Testament writers note with admiration how, like God, watchers ensured the safety of people in their care. (See Psalm 127:1 or Ezekiel 3:17-21.) Their role was also a metaphor forMORE...

Strange metaphors III

This entry is part of an occasional series in which metaphorical ideas find their way onto your screen. Its roots are simple: When you look with fresh eyes, there may be life lessons to find in just about anything…. Something I learned from seaside daytrips when I was a kid: Build sandcastles higher on the beach than the tide can reach. Too close to the pounding surf—whatever you built was wipedMORE...

Pyrrhic thoughts

It seems illogical to pursue winning at all costs, decimating so many assets that further efforts become unsustainable. That’s what Pyrrhus, King of Epirus, realized after his victories over the Roman armies in the Pyrrhic War (BCE 280-275). Although his casualties were fewer than the Romans, he couldn’t replace his troops as readily. “If we are victorious in one more battle,” he remarkedMORE...

Take heed….

Every so often I like to refresh the part of my vocabulary that includes archaic expressions. “Heed” is one of those terms, a *noun or verb that means something like paying attention—perhaps at a slightly deeper level. Making sense out of everything my senses are taking in. Perhaps even doing something about what deserves that kind of attention. Some days it feels to me like there’s too much toMORE...

Strange metaphors II

This entry is part of an occasional series in which metaphorical ideas find their way onto your screen. Its roots are simple: There may be life lessons to find in just about anything. Maybe not all that strange…? My recent trip to a laundromat got me thinking about Baptism. (As Titus 3:5 has it, “the washing of regeneration.”) How Baptism might be like God doing the laundry. Let me set the scene:MORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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