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Lifestyle

This category gathers together blogs that deal with daily life matters. Sometimes generic, other times challenging and always positive, this category embodies the nitty-gritty of fullness-of-life.

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(Dis)oriented?

Trying to find words to express what many of us may experience during these troubled times, I keep coming back to the idea of “disorientation.” When things seem especially out-of-whack—right now?—that descriptor feels useful. These few thoughts…. Our 1 sense of place and direction is an essential part of our neurobiology. Most of us possess adequate proprioception skills—awareness of the locationMORE...

Willing to gamble?

Ever since our state legalized sports betting, our airwaves started filling up with high-energy ads enticing us to engage in what appears to be this exciting, shared activity. The message remains inviting: “It’s about sports, so you can’t lose!” Let me be direct: Sports betting is not about sports, and you will lose. Sports betting may seem benign compared to playing against a casino’s machinesMORE...

One way out of all this?

“The times we’re in….”  Perhaps accompanied by a sad or anxious sigh, these words set in motion a parade of other thoughts. How easily any of us can be frozen by our contemplation of the dangers, sorrows or evils of our day. Inaction solves nothing, but it may feel like the only approach open to us. But perhaps there’s another way out of all of this. Previously I wrote about kenosis, how JesusMORE...

How (little) we know

I’ll admit it: I’m not sure about more and more things. This is new territory for me, and not because I’ve crossed the border into senility. What’s happening almost everywhere? There actually may be less to be certain about. Here’s an example: A *recent newspaper article highlighted the decreasing reliability of tiny computer chips that are essential to our lifestyles. IncreasinglyMORE...

Kenosis all around?

During Lent, one of the things we acknowledge and celebrate is Jesus’ willingness to *empty himself completely in order to take on human form. In the Greek, this is called kenosis, literally a “pouring out”. I may be stretching the point, but there seems to be a lot of this kind of behavior almost everywhere I look. People who are giving up almost everything in order to care for others, to liveMORE...

Smile!

It occurred to me recently that I haven’t been smiling as much as I used to. (Part of my older gentleman’s wrinkles have for *years included the tell-tale creases of repeated beaming.) Noting this possible rumple in my attitude/behavior character traits, I add these few thoughts…. These recent years have seemed full of nonstop, smile-diminishing anxiety. But despite war rumbles, continuingMORE...

Dispersed and disbursed?

(This entry is part of an ongoing collection of blogs that examine the future of congregations post-COVID19. Each entry forms itself around a question looking for clarity or even answers.) The Church has always kept its vitality because of its capacities to draw people into the realm of God’s love, and then to send them out to preach and live that Gospel. But as an institution, the Church hasMORE...

Like an older Smartphone

My *elderly iPhone is showing its age. Its *battery health has been waning recently. It’s moving more slowly, not loading its featured programs as quickly. It takes longer to fully charge this sturdily useful piece of technology. As an artifact within my own elderhood, this phone may be like me in some ways—losing some energy, but still looking forward to more years of sturdy usefulness. InMORE...

Servanthood revisited, Part 3

(Today’s thoughts close this series, bringing hopeful practicality to the theme: Christians are called to servanthood.) Good news remains: We can remain committed to lives of service. Service to God, not to the wealthy. Some personal reflections at this stage in life…. I have the power of speech. My servant-voice is still heard by others. At this time in life, I can be bold in private and publicMORE...

Servanthood revisited, Part 2

(The following thoughts continue a three-part consideration of the theme: Christians are called to servanthood. Today, the possibility that we may be unwilling servants of those who are extraordinarily wealthy.)   It’s possible that the Church’s current usage of “servant” may be more of a widely accepted 1metaphor than an exact match to biblical roles—perhaps an idea that also calls forMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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