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Lifestyle

This category gathers together blogs that deal with daily life matters. Sometimes generic, other times challenging and always positive, this category embodies the nitty-gritty of fullness-of-life.

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Reliable again

  Now that I’m retired, I’ve enjoyed becoming dependable again. It’s not that I was a flake when I was working, but there were plenty of days when I didn’t finish what I had intended, and hadn’t fulfilled my promises or commitments to others. Their phone calls or e-mails had not been returned, their needs were still on my To Do list, their requests continued to linger on my desk. There wereMORE...

Climate conversation 3: A spiritual core?

Today’s entry is part of a periodic series of observations about changes in the world’s climate that will affect all of us, old and young alike. The series bends toward a key question: As God’s people, what can we think or do about these matters? Today’s entry goes to the heart of the matter: This has to do with our faith lives! It can be comforting to worship during Advent…. If you’re at allMORE...

Climate conversation 2: Starting with facts

Today’s entry is part of a periodic series of observations about changes in the world’s climate that will affect all of us, old and young alike. The series will lean into the basic question: As God’s people, what can we think or do about these matters? Today I offer a summary of some essentials. “Earth’s climate is now changing faster than at any point in the history of modern civilizationMORE...

An older Christmas 1

Those of us who are older bring to this season strong memories of Christmas Past—for most of us nothing to be afraid of…. The nostalgia that Christmas brings might be an especially fruitful place to visit alongside older friends and relatives. “How did you used to celebrate Christmas?” can call forth a wonderful array of customs and activities, each wrapped in fascinating stories that drawMORE...

Climate conversation 1: Announcement

Today’s entry begins a periodic series of observations about the certain fact that the changes in the world’s climate will affect all of us, old and young alike. Because this blog tilts in the direction of spiritually centered older adults, the series will lean into the basic question: As God’s people, what can we think or do about these matters? Today an introduction…. It seems fitting to beginMORE...

The end is near II

The entries for yesterday and today look at the idea of “endings”, and how we might react to that idea as it plays out in our lives. Today: How endings effect my spirit. As I move through my seventh decade of life I’m more and more intrigued how ending-ideas worm their way into my thoughts. The current seasons of the calendar and liturgical years nudge me to make sense of these matters. Not justMORE...

An older man gives thanks

Although our culture is already rushing towards Christmas, I’m sticking with the delightful prospect of celebrating Thanksgiving first—reflecting on the thoughts and actions of being thankful at this stage in life. Consider what follows here as the thankful thoughts of an older man. Perhaps someone not unlike you…? To set these ideas in context, you should know that I’m very happy to be an oldMORE...

The colorful people we are

Colorful people like you and me can serve a purpose. That’s one of the thoughts that UCLA psychology professor Alan Castel shares in his new book, Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging. Castel notes that his interest in gerontology started when he was a child, spending considerable time with older relatives—many of them genuinely unique characters who displayed traits thatMORE...

Between ability and fragility

Eventually all of us will cross the line between physical/mental capability and fragility. During this part of life’s journey, the demarcation point might be broad and relatively invisible—a gradual deterioration of strength or the gradual redevelopment of cancer. This boundary could also be thin but highly visible—a stroke or broken hip. In either case, we will reckon with the transition, makingMORE...

Finding humor

Brian Crane, creator of the syndicated cartoon strip Pickles, has a knack for finding the whimsical side of older adult married life. His two main characters, Earl and Opal Pickles, live in retirement with their eyes trained on what’s humorous about being together for over 50 years. Crane’s characters are able to find what’s quirky and playful about this stage in life. The insights of theirMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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