Category

Relationships

This category brings together any blogs that comment on the relationships that exist among older adults, as well as their relationships with people in younger age groups.  Some of these relationships are full, rich and rewarding, while others need effort and prayer. In all cases, relationships keep older adults healthy, spiritually mature and purposed.

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Taken for granted

  The usual/normal line of reasoning about “taking something/someone for granted”: “Don’t ignore your blessings because they’re familiar, close or constant.” This life-axiom makes sense, and its lesson is clear. Another possible meaning pops into focus, though: Perhaps I SHOULD take people (or things) for granted? Hear me out…. Grants are undeserved kindnesses or gifts. Given or receivedMORE...

Mess-makers and mess-sorters

I’m coming off a period of several weeks when digital spam-senders have been sorely afflicting me. This experience got me to thinking about two kinds of people—those who create messes and those who sort them out. In this case, the mess-creators flooded me with unrelenting torrents of unwanted information. Varieties of mess-makers invade other aspects of our lives—perhaps too many to waste ink onMORE...

Imagining the next life stages IV

(Today’s blog is the last in a series of four entries that treat a matter that most older adults eventually face: How will we live well when that becomes difficult?) When the necessary preliminary work is finished, what’s left is the task of finding life-care arrangements that fit our expectations and hopes. Some are intangible—the feel of a facility, personal characteristics of likelyMORE...

An elderly nudge

In times of high anxiety—right now?—two of our core capabilities may be at risk: Agency and motivation. (“Agency” identifies our power to affect change, in ourselves or others. “Motivation” is an inner trait that positively alters our willingness to act.) Why might this diminishing of capabilities be happening? The isolating fear of disease, danger or death during COVID19 may have taken away ourMORE...

Off-the-rails ministry

  It’s difficult to be a pastor in normal times, but that ministry may be even harder right now: Some members and their enterprises are coming undone. Those of us who try to care for others may encounter individuals whose mental states seem to be coming off the rails. As your pastor may be experiencing, that’s tough work. What, then, can we do for our cherished leaders? A few thoughts comeMORE...

Who will follow us?

You may have encountered institutional memory loss when a workplace leader retires, resigns or dies. (Or you may be one of those people whose history and personal expertise are critical to the well-being of your organization—dependably bridging the past, present and future.) In these cases, the major question emerges: “Who will carry forward the essential character of this business?” ThisMORE...

Perseveration begone!

One of my emerging personality traits is beginning to bother me: My tendency to repeat beloved personal stories to people who’ve most likely heard those tales before. Right now, this behavior might be only an occasional vexation, but it might also lead me inexorably towards perseveration—the tendency toward repeated actions, utterance or thought patterns without apparent stimulus. Granted, atMORE...

Dear one

In grade school, when we were learning the format for writing personal letters, some of us—probably the boys—wondered why we always started these letters with “Dear.” So we asked—probably with some pre-teen embarrassment—and the teacher responded with something about “writing conventions that don’t necessarily mean what they say.” Relieved of the possibility of inadvertently expressing ourMORE...

Ranting (and raving)

One of the occasional hobbies of older gentlemen such as myself is the questionably pleasurable practice of ranting. From its local particulars—“Hey, you kids, get off my lawn!”—to its generalized condemnations—“They’re crooks, all of them!”—ranting might seem to be a tolerable way of passing time in impolite company. High-level ranting requires adroit word-finding skills and physical posturingMORE...

Birthdays with older adults

It’s hard to generalize what might constitute a happy birthday celebration for those of us who are older. Some seniors might want to party; others could want a more-subdued observance. Some of us don’t want (or need) any more presents/stuff. Others of us cherish gifts that consist of exceptional experiences that we share with loved ones. Still others like to turn the gift-giving equation on itsMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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