Category

Relationships

This category brings together any blogs that comment on the relationships that exist among older adults, as well as their relationships with people in younger age groups.  Some of these relationships are full, rich and rewarding, while others need effort and prayer. In all cases, relationships keep older adults healthy, spiritually mature and purposed.

R

“The soul of a pastor”

That’s the phrase I recently used to describe the kindness of a reader, someone whose character matches the traits and calling of so many pastors I have known. It occurs to me that the same description might match you. Some thoughts… At their core, most pastors are kind and caring. Mixed into the various roles they take on—e.g., preacher, counselor, teacher, administrator—are those that transcendMORE...

“Good to see you again!”

Easter’s going to be uniquely significant this year. Perhaps that’s especially true for those beloved souls who will find their way back to worship on that Sunday. Sobering global, national or local events will call all of us to consider again what it means to be the people of God in this time and place. It’s likely that Easter worshippers will be especially ready for the Good News that EasterMORE...

Preserving perseveration

Every so often I encounter someone who’s stuck on a story or viewpoint. The phenomenon is called 1perseveration, and we might mark this behavior as slightly problematic in most social settings. The tendency to revisit the same matters unceasingly can be a sign of mild cognitive decline. (One verbal clue: “Have I ever told you about the time when….?”) I’ve been around plenty of worry-proneMORE...

Holding up Moses’ arms today

It’s that time of year when leaders might need some help. Perhaps those of us who are full of years might be the ones to *hold up our Moses’ arms! Post-holiday realities are galumphing back into leaders’ priorities: Future planning, fiscal years wrapping up, performance reviews, annual meeting reports. Some leaders might be nearly overwhelmed by start-of-year tasks, roles or responsibilities; theMORE...

Twitter trees?

(This entry is part of an ongoing collection of blogs that examine the future of congregations post-COVID19. Each entry forms itself around a question looking for clarity or answers.) Two cedar trees in my front yard regularly host a large-group gab session for sparrows, also protecting them from predators. The birds seem to derive pleasure from their flitting and chirping. They return to theseMORE...

Repurposed churches?

(This entry is part of an ongoing collection of blogs that examine the future of congregations post-COVID19. Each entry forms itself around a question looking for clarity or even answers.) It may be so obvious that you might miss it: Post-COVID, our congregations will retain their place as centers for social intelligence. You may think about that fact in different terms, but what takes place inMORE...

Not welcome?

(This entry is part of an ongoing collection of blogs that examine the future of congregations post-COVID19. Each entry forms itself around a question looking for clarity or even answers.) In post-COVID congregations, some questions will remain for the people of God to wrestle with. One seems particularly important for the future of the Church: Who’s welcome and who isn’t? In most places, “AllMORE...

Lost souls

One continuing lament about growing older: The lost souls that continue in my memory without continuing in my current relationships. To be clear, these are not people I have consigned to perdition on account of their persistent perfidies. Instead, they are all the saints with whom I’m no longer in touch. Their state of well-being is unknown to me, their contact information lapsed or lost. TheMORE...

In praise of letter-writing

Years ago I wrote about *pen-pal clubs as a hopeful feature of older adult lifestyles. Today I want to encourage you again to consider letter-writing as a powerful antidote to diminished social contact—a satisfying ministry that you can undertake right now! As you might guess, I like corresponding with others–mostly via e-mail, but sometimes printed or handwritten notes. (That kind ofMORE...

“Blest be the tie that binds”

The singing of this beloved hymn is often accompanied with tears. Its background story tells why: John Fawcett, a rural pastor in 18th century England, realized the mutual love between his congregation, his wife and himself. Instead of leaving for a better-paying position in London, he changed his mind at the last minute—after his farewell sermon—and chose to stay with this small, strugglingMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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