Category

Time

In this category are Full of Years blogs that examine how time fills the lives of older persons. Time as a gift and time as a responsibility. Implicit in all entries: This is a good time to be living fully.

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The quiet family

Today might be a good time to start thinking about this coming Holy Family Sunday: Imagine how it might have felt for Mary and Joseph after the shepherds had headed back to their flocks. This new family was alone once again. Their makeshift maternity ward was still a stable. They were still political pawns in Rome’s bean-counting census. They were still strangers in this village far away fromMORE...

The last time

One Advent theme that doesn’t get much attention comes from the idea that we live in the last times. That the world will end, perhaps soon and perhaps suddenly. The connected thought: As we head toward the end of our lives, there will be a host of “last times”—final events, thoughts and relationships that have graced our lives. Examples: The last Christmas involving your whole family; yourMORE...

The answer to “How long?”

During difficult times, God’s people have repeatedly prayed, “How long, dear Lord? How long?” This plea for rescue from overwhelming circumstances has been an integral part of Jewish spirituality. That prayer may have applied to us, too. Especially recently. It’s also an Advent theme: We await a final rescue, the defeat of enemies who have oppressed all of us. We’re bold to send Heavenward ourMORE...

Signs and wonders

The Advent lectionary sometimes includes Jesus’ comment about signs and wonders that will announce his Second Coming. (See Matthew 24 as an example.) Those omens will include natural disasters as well as human-caused catastrophes. These dark, foreboding omens signal world-ending events God’s people might expect. Today I offer a slightly contrarian view: That some of our contemporary signs andMORE...

A theology of geology?

Each month I read Scientific American, cover to cover. Those explorations almost always lead me down spiritual paths. The same reaction occurred recently as I dug through *Timefulness: How Thinking Like a Geologist Can Help Save the World, a fascinating read authored by geology professor Marcia Bjornerud. Her scientific insights complement biblical theology that I hold dearly. That I find helpfulMORE...

Take heed….

Every so often I like to refresh the part of my vocabulary that includes archaic expressions. “Heed” is one of those terms, a *noun or verb that means something like paying attention—perhaps at a slightly deeper level. Making sense out of everything my senses are taking in. Perhaps even doing something about what deserves that kind of attention. Some days it feels to me like there’s too much toMORE...

Resurrection as repair

Easter’s message promises life after death. Loss of life is the entryway to the blessing of new life, and so we consider death as part of the process God offers in the assuring reality of resurrection. The miracle of this gift comforts us when we encounter death. But what if you and I are not yet dead?  Holding on to something only resembling life, and hoping for new life? Yearning for normalMORE...

Easter in Ukraine

Soon it will be Easter in Ukraine. It’s hard to think much beyond “How can that happen this year?”  The country lies in ruins, made desolate by the warring mind of a desperate Russian dictator. Death is strewn across the landscape, in ways that perhaps stagger Ukrainians’ comprehension. “Resurrection’s victory” squeezes into a smaller mindset, perhaps even too small for imagination or hopeMORE...

1918 Famine relief in Russia and Ukraine

This entry offers the 1outline of a heartening story: After the Russian Revolution and World War I, Lutherans in the United States were significant partners in 2large-scale famine relief in Eastern Europe. In the aftermath of the Bolshevik Revolution and World War I, much of Europe struggled to reconstruct the lives of its citizens. Cities and villages lay in ruins, governments were in disarrayMORE...

A personal note

As I write these few words, bullets and bombs are raining down on the people of Ukraine. An aggressor threatens Eastern Europe, and the specter of another world war haunts us. My older adult mind races: “What can I do about this horror?” One practical answer stands out strongly: It feels like you and I—and others who have come through other dangers and wars—are specially called to exemplify calmMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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