Category

Lifework

Here is where you can find the blogs that gather together the matters of purpose and meaning — essential features of a full life at any age. “Lifework” denotes an intense and long-lived sense of usefulness–something that’s prevalent among older people.

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(Not) obvious?

I sometimes award myself the imaginary degree, an MA in Obvious. It’s my way of reminding myself how unhelpful it can be to speak or write about matters already well-known, perhaps insulting the intelligence and insights of readers and listeners. This tendency may be a personality trait among those of us who have lived longer. Accumulating experience and expertise over our lifetimes—and with anMORE...

Bully Notes III

This blog is the third entry in a series exploring the behaviors of bullies. I offer these thoughts with the possibility that together we can minister to people who use force to influence the rest of us. Today’s observations are about groups of bullies. Bullies may start with what they believe to be worthwhile goals, and so they characterize themselves as having positive attributes. That’s notMORE...

Bully Notes I

This entry is the first part of a series exploring the behaviors and attitudes of bullies. Add these observations to your own, so that together we can understand and perhaps thwart people who use force to influence the rest of us. Today some basic concepts….. Most of us don’t like to be bullied. So we dislike *bullies. That’s simple enough to understand, but perhaps there’s more to this tooMORE...

Bearing the Word

We baptized Wesley on Mother’s Day. A grandchild of the congregation, Wesley was welcomed into the community, but also invited into the work we share: “Bearing God’s creating and redeeming word to all the world.” Funny word, bearing. Maybe even a little bit archaic…. Its derivation goes back to ancient languages in Northern Europe, all of those linguistic roots denoting work. When you bearMORE...

“The soul of a pastor”

That’s the phrase I recently used to describe the kindness of a reader, someone whose character matches the traits and calling of so many pastors I have known. It occurs to me that the same description might match you. Some thoughts… At their core, most pastors are kind and caring. Mixed into the various roles they take on—e.g., preacher, counselor, teacher, administrator—are those that transcendMORE...

What (else) is on the line?

Every day I hear or read that “democracy is on the line,” its core benefits threatened or disappearing. While I agree with those sentiments, there’s probably more at stake than this form of government that we cherish. It’s not difficult to find other elements of our personal and national existence that are perhaps fading or under attack. Each element is an essential component of the over-archingMORE...

Resurrection as repair

Easter’s message promises life after death. Loss of life is the entryway to the blessing of new life, and so we consider death as part of the process God offers in the assuring reality of resurrection. The miracle of this gift comforts us when we encounter death. But what if you and I are not yet dead?  Holding on to something only resembling life, and hoping for new life? Yearning for normalMORE...

Putting away the Alleluias

Our congregation has a Transfiguration Sunday tradition that was especially meaningful this year. It involves a large trunk placed in front of the altar for all to see. During the time for the children’s message, the kids are each given an Alleluia Page, and tasked with the job of writing or drawing their ideas about this word. They are told that during Lent we’ll not be hearing any alleluias inMORE...

Passing the ball

In high school, I was a third-string bench-warmer on the Basketball C-Team. I was keenly aware of the importance of teamwork and scoring. So, when I had that orangish-orb in my possession, I was continually faced with the decision: Dribble, shoot or pass. From my extensive experience as a basketball guy—“Hey, Sitze! Thirty seconds to go in the game. Get in there and make something happen…”—IMORE...

“I used to….”

Every so often in conversations I find myself about to say something like “I used to…” Maybe the same urge comes to the surface in your conversations? If completed, the sentence would recount some skill or experience from our past that might be relevant to the subject at hand. Perhaps some part of our storied histories could add personal notes that would enrich the conversation. Perhaps our faithMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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