Category

Words

The truth remains: Words enable or form thoughts. No words, no thoughts! This category contains Full of Years blogs that play with words. Those associated with old age, and those that add zest to living fully.

W

Elliptical thinking…

You may have noticed that I frequently use ellipses—three dots in a row—as part of my writing style. (I am also indebted to em dashes [–] to bracket my digressions.) Both punctuation conventions can raise eyebrows among highbrow writers—I am not worthy of that designation—as excuses for less-than-adequate writing. I understand that opinion, and try to keep my use of these devices to aMORE...

Strange metaphors V

This entry is part of an occasional series in which metaphorical ideas find their way onto your screen. Its roots are simple: When you look with fresh eyes, there may be life lessons to find in just about anything. Today: When are rocks not solid? Is “rock-solid” a reliable part of your metaphorical vocabulary? If so, you might want to think again!  It turns out that granite—one of our all-timeMORE...

Natal feast ruminations

In less time than it takes to parse “I ain’t no whippersnapper, Sonny,” I’ll be observing a birthday whose number is linked in *Scripture with being strong. When my father reached that milestone, his birthday card included my simple message: “You made it!” I went on to extol the continuing strengths I saw in him. As I approach that same number of years, I know that I can’t credit my well-being toMORE...

The actual Big Lie

  Lying might seem like a necessary social skill. But not when it runs amuck among or inside us. When that happens, lying can careen out of control as it infects more and more of our soul. And what’s “The Big Lie?” That lying accomplishes more than it harms. Lying damages liars. One deception eventually requires a supporting cast of falsehoods that becomes too complex. Liars begin to believeMORE...

Comeuppance

  Sometimes vengeance seems appropriate, even righteous. Great crimes against humanity, rampant selfishness, persistent evil intent, shameless dishonesty, callous harming of others—all feel like legitimate reasons for 1comeuppance. The greater the crimes, the louder the calls for retribution. This is an ageless notion. In ancient Greek mythology, these concepts hearken back to TheMORE...

Elder confessions

It’s a well-established axiom that practical wisdom comes to older adults as they reflect back on lifetimes of experience. I have wondered how that truism might relate to our sinfulness—whether we who are older can still experience any of the “seven deadly sins.” To review: those transgressions— originally identified by the *Desert Fathers—include greed, lust, sloth, gluttony, wrath, pride andMORE...

Visiting iniquities

I’ve always been just a bit concerned about the part of the Ten Commandments story that notes God’s “visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children, unto the third and fourth generation of those that hate me.” (Exodus 20:5 KJV) It has never seemed fair that someone could be punished for what their ancestors did so many years ago. Fair or not, though, this may be true biologicallyMORE...

Unhinged or not?

Current political discourse includes frequent references to “unhinged,” describing a wild, uncontrolled state of mind—sometimes accompanied by ranting, disconnection from reality or paranoid delusions. The term has evolved beyond its original definition—“lacking a hinge mechanism.” As is sometimes true, the meanings can get interesting when —see 1privilege— literal descriptions turn metaphoricalMORE...

Strange metaphors IV

This entry is part of an occasional series in which metaphorical ideas find their way onto your screen. Its roots are simple: When you look with fresh eyes, there may be life lessons to find in just about anything. Today: Unraveling or pruning? It’s tempting to think that life as we know it is unraveling. Current events seem to warrant that assumption: Russia’s war on Ukraine (and on the existingMORE...

Can I get a little pity here?

Based on my mind-melds with doctors whom I follow mindlessly—I’m talking Drs. Oz, Phil and Seuss—I am convinced that my psyche needs more pity. Raw, unadorned sympathy—the kind that has others thinking, “I may have it bad, but look at that miserable Bob Sitze—How does he find any joy in life?” To help elicit your kind commiseration, these details: Because I wear a mask for untold hours, I have toMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

Recent Posts

Blog Topics

Archives

Get in touch

Share your thoughts about the wonder of older years—the fullness of this time in life—on these social media sites.

Receive Updates by Email

* indicates required