Category

Words

The truth remains: Words enable or form thoughts. No words, no thoughts! This category contains Full of Years blogs that play with words. Those associated with old age, and those that add zest to living fully.

W

Wandering thoughts

A few days ago Chris and I watched the Academy Award-winning film, Nomadland. The film follows Fern, a van-dwelling older adult, through a year of her life as a contemporary nomad. The film’s plot moves slowly through a series of small events, gradually revealing Fern’s character and history. Her future? Left in the air at the film’s closing scene. The following thoughts have stuck with me…. FernMORE...

At any moment

Lately I’ve noticed the increasing appearance of inflection point. This new 1 buzzword signals that we’ve ridden the arc of our society downward, and are at the point where the direction of our nation is turning upward again. Commentators usually name a specific event as a possible arc-turning moment. An inflection point clearly divides before from after, and carries an implicitly hopeful messageMORE...

Languishing?

  Lately I’ve noticed the recurring appearance of  “1 languishing”, a term used to describe how the COVID pandemic may have affected the nation. The non-languishing part of me wants to 2 push back. I’m still vibrant, alert, eager about life, grateful and generous. I still have miles to go, with plenty of oomph to explore fascinating horizons. I don’t want to be set aside quite yet. As I edgeMORE...

Word therapy?

Over the years, I’ve noticed that the first signs of cognitive decline and dementia often appear as the loss of memory regarding nouns. A key indicator seems to be the substitution of the word “things” in place of the names for ordinary items. Even common synonyms aren’t  available, so “things” becomes the go-to noun. This is a useful work-around, but also can be a signal that word-recallMORE...

A playing time

  Easter has come, but it’s not gone! The meaning of this incredible event includes a life-renewing invitation, perhaps directed at those of us who are fully vaccinated: “Can you come out to play?” Given all that we’ve been through this past year, “play” may seem like too strong a word for how we might live now. Fun and frivolity may feel like empty-headed avoidance of reality. Over thisMORE...

A harrowing time

A 1 harrowing time One of Easter’s necessary events is the descent of Jesus into Hell—to the souls in Hell or to the dead. A 2 harrowing experience. The as yet un-resurrected Jesus went from his horrific death on the cross to the depths of Hell. No matter whether a physical location, state of mind or spiritual condition—Hell was not a welcoming place. Turns out that Jesus time in Hell was notMORE...

Estate sale miscellany

This entry is part of a blog series, Time Capsules, that considers what our family’s stored artifacts tell about our family history. Today, I invite you to look at the keepsakes scattered throughout our home. Estate sales sometimes include a bin labeled “Miscellaneous”. In this container is all the stuff that couldn’t be assigned monetary worth. After more easily identified articles are sold andMORE...

Stalwart seniors

1 Stalwart seniors Ever have one of those days when most things that catch your eye take the air out of your tires? That happened to me a few days back, when going through an esteemed journal I encountered reporting that put the D is “dismay” and the G in “give up”. That evening, I read an article about how social media was tricking pre-teens across the world to buy impulsively—and soonMORE...

Wretched individualism

1 Individualism took a hit in Texas this past week. Alongside the punishing circumstances of power outages and bursting water pipes was the realization that disregard for the common good eventually hurts everyone. Even those who thought of themselves as rugged or self-sufficient were brought to their knees—a distressing posture when your power is out and your knees are deep in freezing waterMORE...

*Obituary tips

If icebergs reveal only their tips—they aren’t shy, just heavy—it seems possible that obituaries might also share that characteristic. Perhaps the same heft.  In both cases, there’s more to be seen and told. I have known about this similarity—icebergs and obituaries—for years. Every day I read the Obituary section of the newspaper. I wrote obits for both my parents. I understand how theMORE...

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Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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