Category

Pleasure/Pain

Here’s the category that holds together some disparate elements of life in one’s later years. Problems and their resolutions, pain and its consequences–but also the down-to-earth pleasures that can grace the days of an older person. Pleasure and pain may exist side-by-side, here and in life!

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Vulnerable gratitude

  I didn’t used to think I was vulnerable. I tried to fortify my capabilities so that I could defend myself—and those I love—from dangers that might come along. I was young then, and those were different times.  I don’t think that way any more. In these later decades, I have come to see that, along with everyone else, I have always been exposed to perils. Lately it has occurred to me that myMORE...

Can I get a little pity here?

Based on my mind-melds with doctors whom I follow mindlessly—I’m talking Drs. Oz, Phil and Seuss—I am convinced that my psyche needs more pity. Raw, unadorned sympathy—the kind that has others thinking, “I may have it bad, but look at that miserable Bob Sitze—How does he find any joy in life?” To help elicit your kind commiseration, these details: Because I wear a mask for untold hours, I have toMORE...

The inertia of an object at rest

After our early morning exercise class, Chris and I take time for rest before going about our day. The hour of physical effort tires us out just enough to require some down time. But if we rest too long, 1inertia sets in, sometimes making it difficult to gather energy and will for what’s next. We live a fairly unscheduled calendar, so that’s not usually a problem. I’m a bit bothered, though, byMORE...

Bible study exultation (continued)

When last I wrote about the benefits of weekly Bible study groups in congregations, I left out a few thoughts. Here are some of them…. Our group’s Scripture conversations are an extension (or preview) of the proclamation of The Word in weekly worship. Whether based on the lectionary or not, Bible study somehow always connects with what has been (or will be) shared in a Sunday service. ThisMORE...

Easter sacrifices

From a minor theme in Eastertide, this question, “Who sacrificed their well-being to take care of Jesus’ body?” To say that another way, someone has to pay for the cost of preparing a corpse for burial. In some cultures, the death of a loved one can bring a family into poverty, perhaps made worse when the primary breadwinner has died. In Jesus’ case, Nicodemus paid for the burial site—giving awayMORE...

Playing through the pain

Most athletes know how this works: When you play a sport, you get hurt. Over time you learn how to keep playing in spite of the pain. It’s not pleasant—who wants to carry around pain–but it’s still part of the whole experience of being a sportsperson, especially so for professional players. I have observed this phenomenon among the participants in our older adult group exercise classes. WeMORE...

One way out of all this?

“The times we’re in….”  Perhaps accompanied by a sad or anxious sigh, these words set in motion a parade of other thoughts. How easily any of us can be frozen by our contemplation of the dangers, sorrows or evils of our day. Inaction solves nothing, but it may feel like the only approach open to us. But perhaps there’s another way out of all of this. Previously I wrote about kenosis, how JesusMORE...

Smile!

It occurred to me recently that I haven’t been smiling as much as I used to. (Part of my older gentleman’s wrinkles have for *years included the tell-tale creases of repeated beaming.) Noting this possible rumple in my attitude/behavior character traits, I add these few thoughts…. These recent years have seemed full of nonstop, smile-diminishing anxiety. But despite war rumbles, continuingMORE...

Saints’ and angels’ delight

I really like going to church on Sundays. That hasn’t always been true all of my life, but right now Sunday morning worship is one of the high points of any week. This past Sunday, one of the prayers for the day included the phrase, “Whom saints and angels delight to worship.”  Referring to God, of course.  The word “delight” struck me as important, an idea that I had not considered all thatMORE...

Rejoicing in okay

When asked to characterize my well-being on surveys, I used to check the EXCELLENT box automatically. These days I’ve moved down one frame to the GOOD descriptor. And I’m happy to do so, rejoicing about being just okay. GOOD is also a strong adjective to be glad about. Let me explain…. Perhaps like you, over the years I’ve faced my share of ill health and physical deterioration. Without gettingMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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