Category

Personal Power

Too many older adults feel as though they have lost power as they age. The exact opposite may be true, and this category assembles the blogs that explain and celebrate this certainty: Our personal power may remain strong and useful in our later years.

P

A new lemon metaphor?

Okay, complete the following axiom:  “If life gives you lemons, ……!  Schooled in the intricate arcania of maxims, most folks would write something on the order of “make lemonade,” right?  That seems fair enough—we want to be positive about the bad breaks or sour moments in our life’s journey, so lemonade-making seems like the positive, asset-based thing to do with an accumulation of lemonsMORE...

After the apex

There must surely come the time when my life’s high point will have been reached. It’s hard to pin down the exact moment or description of when that will occur, but right now it feels honest to admit that I am no longer at my peak. Some after-apex thoughts follow…. It’s also truthful to acknowledge gratefully the years when much of my life felt like an ascending path, reaching towards increasedMORE...

Upfront uplifting

Lately I’ve been swatting away a foreboding that whirs around me like a mosquito looking for more than a good meal.  To be direct, the ongoing drought out West has gotten to my spirit. Various swatting-maneuvers—corporate worship, devotional reading, conversations, prayer—have helped for awhile, but then the pesky facts keep buzzing back: Californians will run out of water by August, part of theMORE...

Blessed assurance

  Schools are out, so this may be the time of year when your grandparenting kicks into high gear. A good share of that honored relationship could be summarized in the phrase, “Blessed assurance.”  (Yes, I am aware that some readers may accuse me of stealing words from a beloved hymn writer. In my defense, though, let’s just say that I’m singing them differently….) Much of your work withMORE...

The other side of pastoral care

I don’t know for sure, but it feels to me like this pandemic has been especially hard for pastors and other professional church workers. Most professional leaders seem to be enduring all of this—quiet and uncomplaining—even when they might feel alone in keeping their congregations functioning. Many of them have also had to deal with the burden of keeping their congregations financially viableMORE...

Languishing?

  Lately I’ve noticed the recurring appearance of  “1 languishing”, a term used to describe how the COVID pandemic may have affected the nation. The non-languishing part of me wants to 2 push back. I’m still vibrant, alert, eager about life, grateful and generous. I still have miles to go, with plenty of oomph to explore fascinating horizons. I don’t want to be set aside quite yet. As I edgeMORE...

Word therapy?

Over the years, I’ve noticed that the first signs of cognitive decline and dementia often appear as the loss of memory regarding nouns. A key indicator seems to be the substitution of the word “things” in place of the names for ordinary items. Even common synonyms aren’t  available, so “things” becomes the go-to noun. This is a useful work-around, but also can be a signal that word-recallMORE...

Post-pandemic bread

  Post-pandemic 1panis This 2  COVID thing is going to end. And when it does, churches like yours and mine might just hold the secret for pan-societal renewal. Turns out that one of our historical cultural strengths—fellowship fueled by food—might just be the key to restoring vitality to our communities. Think back: Passover was a post-pandemic event. One of our most sacred practices centersMORE...

A playing time

  Easter has come, but it’s not gone! The meaning of this incredible event includes a life-renewing invitation, perhaps directed at those of us who are fully vaccinated: “Can you come out to play?” Given all that we’ve been through this past year, “play” may seem like too strong a word for how we might live now. Fun and frivolity may feel like empty-headed avoidance of reality. Over thisMORE...

A harrowing time

A 1 harrowing time One of Easter’s necessary events is the descent of Jesus into Hell—to the souls in Hell or to the dead. A 2 harrowing experience. The as yet un-resurrected Jesus went from his horrific death on the cross to the depths of Hell. No matter whether a physical location, state of mind or spiritual condition—Hell was not a welcoming place. Turns out that Jesus time in Hell was notMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

Recent Posts

Blog Topics

Archives

Get in touch

Share your thoughts about the wonder of older years—the fullness of this time in life—on these social media sites.

Receive Updates by Email

* indicates required