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Personal Power

Too many older adults feel as though they have lost power as they age. The exact opposite may be true, and this category assembles the blogs that explain and celebrate this certainty: Our personal power may remain strong and useful in our later years.

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Servanthood revisited, Part 3

(Today’s thoughts close this series, bringing hopeful practicality to the theme: Christians are called to servanthood.) Good news remains: We can remain committed to lives of service. Service to God, not to the wealthy. Some personal reflections at this stage in life…. I have the power of speech. My servant-voice is still heard by others. At this time in life, I can be bold in private and publicMORE...

In praise of letter-writing

Years ago I wrote about *pen-pal clubs as a hopeful feature of older adult lifestyles. Today I want to encourage you again to consider letter-writing as a powerful antidote to diminished social contact—a satisfying ministry that you can undertake right now! As you might guess, I like corresponding with others–mostly via e-mail, but sometimes printed or handwritten notes. (That kind ofMORE...

What about change?

Lately I’m having trouble with change. As one well-practiced in transformation, I wonder whether change per se is being over-sold just a bit. It wasn’t always this way. Decades ago, I learned from effective leaders and wise older mentors how change can (and cannot) happen. I’ve experienced change throughout my life. pursuing about a dozen careers, relocating to eight different parts of theMORE...

He that hath ears…

I think I may have discovered another unique advantage of growing older: Bigger, longer ears! The results of gravity’s pull, larger ears—and *noses, too—elongate because their underlying elasticity decreases over time. Aging cartilage, collagen and skin allow both women’s and men’s ears to get longer at the rate of .22 millimeters per year. The result: The longer you live, the longer your earsMORE...

Cursed be the binds that tie

If the centuries-old hymn is right—there are blessed ties that bind me to others —I wonder if there are also cursed binds that tie or obstruct me. Another way to consider the matter: What enwraps or impedes me so thoroughly that I can’t escape, and what can I do about these shackles or blockages? A first step: Name the bonds that entrap me or stop me cold. I can examine my unhealthy habits orMORE...

I hear you

Because of hearing aids, my auditory capabilities extend far beyond my ears. These tiny devices, matched to the color of my remaining hair, enable me to hear far better than I thought possible. Years ago, I wasn’t ready to admit that my frequent “Huhs?” were a problem. I was never going to wear an ungainly technology that would reveal that I wasn’t tracking much of what was happening around me. IMORE...

We pray

These two short words introduce each Sunday’s Prayer of the Day, summoning the collected thoughts of God’s people. They’re an ordinary part of each worship service, capturing the gist of the day’s lessons and inviting us beyond what’s ordinary. In these times, “we pray” seems more necessary than ever. As both invitation and statement of fact, these two words describe one of the core elements ofMORE...

Dealing with anger hopefully

It’s difficult to treat addictions of any kind, and anger addiction adds its own layers of complexity. The complications are easy to see: Anger is both an individual and group phenomenon. A subculture of anger-merchants has worked for decades to insert anger into the way this society functions. Fuel for continuing anger is easily accessible, so those addicted to anger may not seek help. PoliticsMORE...

Anger addiction

Let me be blunt. “Anger addiction” is not a metaphor or a loosely applied descriptor. People who are easily and continually angry exhibit the same behaviors as those addicted to any substances or habits that are ultimately harmful to them and those around them. Those who engage in anger as a preferred or constant practice are addicts. The evidence is clear: Whole segments of our population are inMORE...

Anger summarized

Anger is both a necessary and harmful part of human psychology. As a feature of our emotional brains, anger is: Automatic: Part of the brain’s response to stress and danger—fighting/fleeing/freezing—anger comes into play quickly and efficiently to diminish the danger. A few brain structures short-circuit our normal decision-making process. Necessary and useful: Our brains require protection forMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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