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Personal Power

Too many older adults feel as though they have lost power as they age. The exact opposite may be true, and this category assembles the blogs that explain and celebrate this certainty: Our personal power may remain strong and useful in our later years.

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Homemade cognitive exercises

Experts in cognitive health tell us that we can strengthen mental acuity by exercising our mental functions. The maxim, “Use it or lose it”, applies quite well to puzzles, board games, reading, writing and conversation. This gets me thinking about the possibility of inventing my own mental exercises. Here are some word-related brain calisthenics I engage in regularly: ANAGRAMS – Playing with theMORE...

Legacy revisited

(If you’ve been reading these entries for awhile, you’ll recognize legacy as a recuring idea. Today the same theme, but with a twist that might be helpful for your spirit in these times.) Some days it’s hard to find or hold a positive perspective about what’s occurring in our world. Years ago I wrote a book about *finding hope. I was convinced back then—as I am now—that one source for hope mightMORE...

Dementiated conversations

For about twelve years, I’ve visited a resident—let’s call her Gladys—at the same assisted living facility where my mother spent her last years. We used to talk about current events, revived memories, family circumstances and wisdom of all kinds. Now, with Gladys’s dementia working its will, the back-and-forth of a satisfying conversation might seem impossible. That’s not true, thoughMORE...

Take heed….

Every so often I like to refresh the part of my vocabulary that includes archaic expressions. “Heed” is one of those terms, a *noun or verb that means something like paying attention—perhaps at a slightly deeper level. Making sense out of everything my senses are taking in. Perhaps even doing something about what deserves that kind of attention. Some days it feels to me like there’s too much toMORE...

“The soul of a pastor”

That’s the phrase I recently used to describe the kindness of a reader, someone whose character matches the traits and calling of so many pastors I have known. It occurs to me that the same description might match you. Some thoughts… At their core, most pastors are kind and caring. Mixed into the various roles they take on—e.g., preacher, counselor, teacher, administrator—are those that transcendMORE...

Strange metaphors I

This entry is part of an occasional series in which metaphors of dubious worth find their way onto your screen. Its roots are simple: I may have too much time on my hands OR there may be life lessons to find in just about anything. Maybe not all that strange…?  I hold in my frustrated hands a slender produce bag. If it’s ever opened by my clumsy fingers, it will hold fresh veggies or fruit that IMORE...

Easter sacrifices

From a minor theme in Eastertide, this question, “Who sacrificed their well-being to take care of Jesus’ body?” To say that another way, someone has to pay for the cost of preparing a corpse for burial. In some cultures, the death of a loved one can bring a family into poverty, perhaps made worse when the primary breadwinner has died. In Jesus’ case, Nicodemus paid for the burial site—giving awayMORE...

Resurrection as repair

Easter’s message promises life after death. Loss of life is the entryway to the blessing of new life, and so we consider death as part of the process God offers in the assuring reality of resurrection. The miracle of this gift comforts us when we encounter death. But what if you and I are not yet dead?  Holding on to something only resembling life, and hoping for new life? Yearning for normalMORE...

Easter in Ukraine

Soon it will be Easter in Ukraine. It’s hard to think much beyond “How can that happen this year?”  The country lies in ruins, made desolate by the warring mind of a desperate Russian dictator. Death is strewn across the landscape, in ways that perhaps stagger Ukrainians’ comprehension. “Resurrection’s victory” squeezes into a smaller mindset, perhaps even too small for imagination or hopeMORE...

“Good to see you again!”

Easter’s going to be uniquely significant this year. Perhaps that’s especially true for those beloved souls who will find their way back to worship on that Sunday. Sobering global, national or local events will call all of us to consider again what it means to be the people of God in this time and place. It’s likely that Easter worshippers will be especially ready for the Good News that EasterMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

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