Category

Arcania

An odd category at first glance, this is the place where you can find odd facts, rocks you can turn over, minutia that’s important, wandering musings and rabbit trails to tempt you into different realms of thought. “Miscellany” might describe the category, and it might not….

A

A new lemon metaphor?

Okay, complete the following axiom:  “If life gives you lemons, ……!  Schooled in the intricate arcania of maxims, most folks would write something on the order of “make lemonade,” right?  That seems fair enough—we want to be positive about the bad breaks or sour moments in our life’s journey, so lemonade-making seems like the positive, asset-based thing to do with an accumulation of lemonsMORE...

Outliers unite!

  As I cruise the highways and byways of American senior adult life, I often come upon folks whose spirituality can be described as “outlier.”  Re-affirmed by *Malcom Gladwell, the term may also illustrate an important feature of older-adult spirituality: Individuals who don’t always feel connected to the usual manifestations of Christianity. Not all of us consider ourselves outliers, ofMORE...

Perguado reliquias

Today’s entry continues in the tradition of Latinate aphorisms for daily life—e.g., * Soli Deo gloria, Carpe diem or Ubi est mea anaticula cumminosa? These time-honored insights may far outweigh the value of this blog’s new maxim: Perguado religuias!  You be the judge…. As the years of my life add up and the tidbits of foods in our refrigerator gather together to form inviting aggregations, I amMORE...

“Whose god is their belly”

Looking for things to gross me out—a questionable luxury of retired guy-ness—I recently came upon a story prepping readers for news about the annual contest sponsored by Nathan’s Famous Hot Dogs. Because the idea of “competitive eating”—the term favored by *Major League Eating (MLE)—struck me as just bit more than odd, I kept reading. What I found seemed to be emblematic about any of us who haveMORE...

Three hundred words

That’s what you’ll read here today, and almost every other time one of these entries comes your way. About 300 words—the length in feet of a football field—that take about two minutes to read—the amount of time it takes to run that far. (Mixing metaphors is still an enjoyable part of my writing.) Why that length? I don’t want to be one of the chatterati, a class of writers or talkers who alwaysMORE...

Shadows of beauty

A few nights ago, I dreamed about being part of a meditative evening service at our church, with some post-COVID perils still lingering in worshipers’ minds. We ended the service by singing a canticle whose melody was framed around the evocative chordal structures of ancient modes/key signatures. (Those musical elements continue as reminders of the sturdiness of our faith practices over theMORE...

Gratitude by any other adjective

In my ongoing effort to enliven ecclesiological language, I offer the following adjectival additions to the concept of gratitude. First, let’s start with the presumption that gratitude may need some help. Some of the church’s verbiage illustrates this necessity—as in “the attitude of gratitude.” (Note here the extra oomph that rhyming adds to the concept of thankfulness!)  Second, let’s imagineMORE...

Rhizomes among us

NOTE: It is said that when you let a writer loose in a garden, you can expect perhaps-strange exultations framed by organic metaphors. Today I illustrate how that maxim might be true! While battling the gardener’s scourge that is Creeping Charlie, I found myself wondering why *rhizomes seem so widespread, so insistent and so successful. After a little research I found that this variety ofMORE...

The bathing robin

Today’s entry is a tale that fits within the general category, “I’m happy to be alive.” No metaphor, moral teaching or invitation to action. Sometimes it’s enough just to tell a story. For my previous birthday, I received a yellow ceramic bird bath (with stand) and a solar-powered mini-fountain. It sits in a safe place in our back yard, attracting a good number of birds for drinking and bathingMORE...

*A rhapsody on F minor

  A significant part of my solitary thoughts—including those during my dreams—have music attached to them. Active somewhere deep in some unnamed corner of my brain, the intricacies of music spark my imagination and memory. I sometimes find myself recalling or reconstructing moments of music that I’ve played, sung or directed. Because of my training and life experiences, most of that music isMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

Recent Posts

Blog Topics

Archives

Get in touch

Share your thoughts about the wonder of older years—the fullness of this time in life—on these social media sites.

Receive Updates by Email

* indicates required