Category

Arcania

An odd category at first glance, this is the place where you can find odd facts, rocks you can turn over, minutia that’s important, wandering musings and rabbit trails to tempt you into different realms of thought. “Miscellany” might describe the category, and it might not….

A

Signs and wonders

The Advent lectionary sometimes includes Jesus’ comment about signs and wonders that will announce his Second Coming. (See Matthew 24 as an example.) Those omens will include natural disasters as well as human-caused catastrophes. These dark, foreboding omens signal world-ending events God’s people might expect. Today I offer a slightly contrarian view: That some of our contemporary signs andMORE...

Address book prayers

I’ve always liked the idea of praying without ceasing. But this ideal can be different from the reality. Sometimes it can be difficult for me to maintain focus or direction. Thoughts don’t always come easily. That’s when I try to pray without getting stuck—to pray without seizing. An experience with one of my address books has helped me find a new way to explore this prayer practice. Recently IMORE...

The elephants in the room

Some things are better left unsaid. This is not one of them. In this entry I want to share my observations about older folks being dinosaurs. What got me started on this semi-rant was a recent experience: Hearing a competent, active and admired older leader wonder whether he had become a dinosaur in his chosen profession. I started asking myself the same question. My YES/NO answer: I may be likeMORE...

For church secretaries (only)

In every congregation I’ve been part of, a church secretary like you has been at the center of the congregation’s health and vitality. I’ve known some of you as colleagues, others as friends and one as beloved in-law! From those relationships and those experiences, these words of appreciation. Some of you have job titles that more closely characterize your ministries—e.g., parish administratorMORE...

A theology of geology?

Each month I read Scientific American, cover to cover. Those explorations almost always lead me down spiritual paths. The same reaction occurred recently as I dug through *Timefulness: How Thinking Like a Geologist Can Help Save the World, a fascinating read authored by geology professor Marcia Bjornerud. Her scientific insights complement biblical theology that I hold dearly. That I find helpfulMORE...

Elliptical thinking…

You may have noticed that I frequently use ellipses—three dots in a row—as part of my writing style. (I am also indebted to em dashes [–] to bracket my digressions.) Both punctuation conventions can raise eyebrows among highbrow writers—I am not worthy of that designation—as excuses for less-than-adequate writing. I understand that opinion, and try to keep my use of these devices to aMORE...

“Whose god is their stomach….”

Over the years, I’ve wondered just what stomach-as-god religiosity would entail. Today I direct my usually serious spiritual nature towards that matter—a religion centered on stomachs. First, the name. I’m thinking maybe Bellyacity, 1Vagalanity, Tummyology or the more elegant Abdomenalism. Other beliefs and practices would fall into place: Chefs would be admired as holy women and men, restaurantsMORE...

Strange metaphors V

This entry is part of an occasional series in which metaphorical ideas find their way onto your screen. Its roots are simple: When you look with fresh eyes, there may be life lessons to find in just about anything. Today: When are rocks not solid? Is “rock-solid” a reliable part of your metaphorical vocabulary? If so, you might want to think again!  It turns out that granite—one of our all-timeMORE...

Natal feast ruminations

In less time than it takes to parse “I ain’t no whippersnapper, Sonny,” I’ll be observing a birthday whose number is linked in *Scripture with being strong. When my father reached that milestone, his birthday card included my simple message: “You made it!” I went on to extol the continuing strengths I saw in him. As I approach that same number of years, I know that I can’t credit my well-being toMORE...

Original antigentic sin

News you may have missed: The default tendency of our bodies’ *antigens to combat previously known invaders, but not necessarily their newer mutations. An example: Those infected with earlier forms of COVID19—or immunized against Delta, Omnicron and their viral cousins—might not develop or maintain the antigens necessary to combat newly emerging variants. Epidemiologists have dubbed thisMORE...

Bob Sitze

BOB SITZE has filled the many years of his lifework in diverse settings around the United States. His calling has included careers as a teacher/principal, church musician, writer/author, denominational executive staff member and meat worker. Bob lives in Wheaton, IL.

Recent Posts

Blog Topics

Archives

Get in touch

Share your thoughts about the wonder of older years—the fullness of this time in life—on these social media sites.

Receive Updates by Email

* indicates required